The information in this preliminary prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus is not complete and may be changed. This preliminary prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus are part of an effective registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. This preliminary prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus are not an offer to sell, nor do they seek an offer to buy, these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted.

Filed Pursuant to Rule 424(b)(3)
Registration No. 333-183728

SUBJECT TO COMPLETION, DATED FEBRUARY 28, 2013

PRELIMINARY PROSPECTUS SUPPLEMENT
(to Prospectus dated May 17, 2010)

      Depositary Units
Representing Limited Partner Interests

[GRAPHIC MISSING]

Icahn Enterprises L.P.

We are offering       depositary units representing limited partner interests in Icahn Enterprises L.P. Our depositary units are traded on The NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “IEP.” On February 28, 2013, the last reported sales price of our depositary units on The NASDAQ Global Select Market was $71.49 per depositary unit.

Investing in our depositary units involves a high degree of risk. Please read “Risk Factors” beginning on page S-23 of this prospectus supplement, on page 3 of the accompanying prospectus, and in the documents incorporated by reference into this prospectus supplement.

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or passed upon the adequacy or accuracy of this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

   
  PER
DEPOSITARY UNIT
  TOTAL
Public offering price   $                   $           
Underwriting discounts and commissions   $     $  
Proceeds to Icahn Enterprises L.P., before expenses   $     $  

Delivery of the depositary units is expected to be made on or about           , 2013. We have granted the underwriter an option for a period of 30 days to purchase an additional          of our depositary units. If the underwriter exercises the option in full, the total underwriting discounts and commissions payable by us will be $    , and the total proceeds to us, before expenses, will be $    .

Sole Book-Running Manager

Jefferies

Prospectus Supplement dated            , 2013


 
 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

PROSPECTUS SUPPLEMENT

 
  Page
IMPORTANT NOTICE ABOUT INFORMATION IN THIS PROSPECTUS SUPPLEMENT AND THE ACCOMPANYING PROSPECTUS     S-ii  
FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS     S-ii  
PROSPECTUS SUPPLEMENT SUMMARY     S-1  
SUMMARY CONSOLIDATED HISTORICAL AND PRO FORMA FINANCIAL DATA     S-17  
RISK FACTORS     S-23  
USE OF PROCEEDS     S-27  
CAPITALIZATION     S-28  
PRICE RANGE OF DEPOSITARY UNITS AND DISTRIBUTIONS     S-29  
MATERIAL U.S. FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSIDERATIONS     S-30  
UNDERWRITING     S-44  
LEGAL MATTERS     S-50  
EXPERTS     S-50  
WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION     S-50  
INCORPORATION OF INFORMATION FILED WITH THE SEC     S-51  

PROSPECTUS

 
  Page
FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION     1  
OUR COMPANY     2  
RATIO OF EARNINGS TO FIXED CHARGES     2  
ABOUT THIS PROSPECTUS     3  
RISK FACTORS     3  
USE OF PROCEEDS     3  
DESCRIPTION OF DEPOSITARY UNITS     4  
DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED UNITS     6  
OUR PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT AND CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF DELAWARE LAW     7  
DESCRIPTION OF DEBT SECURITIES     12  
DESCRIPTION OF WARRANTS TO PURCHASE DEBT SECURITIES     20  
DESCRIPTION OF WARRANTS TO PURCHASE DEPOSITARY UNITS OR PREFERRED UNITS     21  
PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION     21  
LEGAL MATERS     22  
EXPERTS     22  
WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION     23  
INCORPORATION OF CERTAIN DOCUMENTS BY REFERENCE     23  

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IMPORTANT NOTICE ABOUT INFORMATION IN THIS PROSPECTUS
SUPPLEMENT AND THE ACCOMPANYING PROSPECTUS

This document is in two parts. The first part is this prospectus supplement, which describes the specific terms of this offering of depositary units and also adds to and updates information contained in the accompanying prospectus and the documents incorporated by reference into this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus. The second part is the accompanying prospectus, which gives more general information about securities we may offer from time to time, some of which may not apply to this offering of depositary units. Generally, when we refer only to the “prospectus,” we are referring to both parts combined.

If the information relating to the offering varies between the prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus, you should rely on the information in this prospectus supplement.

You should rely only on the information contained or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus or any free writing prospectus prepared by or on behalf of Icahn Enterprises L.P. We have not, and the underwriter has not, authorized any other person to provide you with different or additional information. If anyone provides you with different or inconsistent information, you should not rely on it. We are not, and the underwriter is not, making an offer to sell the depositary units in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted. You should not assume that the information contained or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement or in the accompanying prospectus is accurate as of any date other than the date on the front of that document. Our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may have changed since such date.

You should read and consider all information contained or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus before making your investment decision.

Unless we indicate otherwise, the information presented in this prospectus supplement assumes that the underwriter does not exercise its option to purchase additional depositary units.

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This prospectus supplement and the documents incorporated by reference in the accompanying prospectus may contain “forward-looking statements.” Forward-looking statements are those that do not relate solely to historical fact. They include, but are not limited to, any statement that may predict, forecast, indicate or imply future results, performance, achievements or events. Forward-looking statements can generally be identified by phrases such as “believes,” “expects,” “potential,” “continues,” “may,” “should,” “seeks,” “predicts,” “anticipates,” “intends,” “projects,” “estimates,” “plans,” “could,” “designed,” “should be” and other similar expressions that denote expectations of future or conditional events rather than statements of fact. Forward-looking statements also may relate to strategies, plans and objectives for, and potential results of, future operations, financial results, financial condition, business prospects, growth strategy and liquidity, and are based upon management’s current plans and beliefs or current estimates of future results or trends.

These forward-looking statements reflect our current views with respect to future events and are based on assumptions and subject to risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from trends, plans or expectations set forth in the forward-looking statements. These risks and uncertainties may include these factors and the risks and uncertainties described in the section entitled “Risk Factors” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011 and in the sections entitled “Risk Factors” in our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q for the quarterly periods ended March 31, 2012, June 30, 2012 and September 30, 2012, as well as those risk factors included under “Risk Factors” in this prospectus. Among these risks are: risks related to economic downturns, substantial competition and rising operating costs; risks related to our investment activities, including the nature of the investments made by the Funds we manage, losses in the Funds and loss of key employees; risks related to our automotive activities, including exposure to adverse conditions in the automotive industry, and risks related to operations in foreign countries; risks related to our energy business, including the volatility and availability of crude oil, other feed stocks and refined products, unfavorable refining margin (crack spread), interrupted access to pipelines, significant fluctuations in nitrogen fertilizer demand in the agricultural industry and seasonality of results; risk related to

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our gaming operations, including reductions in discretionary spending due to a downturn in the local, regional or national economy, intense competition in the gaming industry from present and emerging internet online markets and extensive regulation; risks related to our railcar activities, including reliance upon a small number of customers that represent a large percentage of revenues and backlog, the health of and prospects for the overall railcar industry and the cyclical nature of the railcar manufacturing business; risks related to our food packaging activities, including competition from better capitalized competitors, inability of its suppliers to timely deliver raw materials, and the failure to effectively respond to industry changes in casings technology; risks related to our scrap metals activities, including potential environmental exposure; risks related to our real estate activities, including the extent of any tenant bankruptcies and insolvencies; risks related to our home fashion operations, including changes in the availability and price of raw materials, and changes in transportation costs and delivery times; and other risks and uncertainties detailed from time to time in our filings with the SEC.

Given these risks and uncertainties, we urge you to read this prospectus completely and with the understanding that actual future results may be materially different from what we plan or expect. All of the forward-looking statements made in this prospectus are qualified by these cautionary statements and we cannot assure you that the actual results or developments anticipated by us will be realized or, even if substantially realized, that they will have the expected consequences to or effects on our business or operations. In addition, these forward-looking statements present our estimates and assumptions only as of the date of this prospectus. We do not intend to update you concerning any future revisions to any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances occurring after the date of this prospectus. However, you should carefully review the risk factors set forth in other reports or documents we file from time to time with the SEC.

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PROSPECTUS SUPPLEMENT SUMMARY

The following summary highlights information about us, this offering and information appearing elsewhere included or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus and in the documents we incorporate by reference. This summary is not complete and does not contain all of the information that you should consider before making an investment decision. You should read carefully the entire prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus, the documents incorporated by reference and the other documents to which we refer herein for a more complete understanding of this offering, including the factors described under the heading “Risk Factors” in this prospectus supplement beginning on page S-3, together with any free writing prospectus we have authorized for use in connection with this offering and the financial statements and other information included or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement. This prospectus supplement may add to, update or change information in the accompanying prospectus. Except where the context otherwise requires or indicates, in this prospectus, (i) “Icahn Enterprises,” “the Company,” “we,” “us” and “our” refer to Icahn Enterprises L.P. and its subsidiaries and, with respect to acquired businesses, Mr. Icahn and his affiliates prior to our acquisition, (ii) “Holding Company” refers to the unconsolidated results and financial position of Icahn Enterprises and Icahn Enterprises Holdings and (iii) “fiscal year” refers to the twelve-month period ended December 31 of the applicable year.

The Icahn Strategy

Across all of our businesses, our success is based on a simple formula: we seek to find undervalued companies in the Graham & Dodd tradition. However, while the typical Graham & Dodd value investor purchases undervalued securities and waits for results, we often become actively involved in the companies we target. That activity may involve a broad range of approaches, from influencing the management of a target to take steps to improve shareholder value, to acquiring a controlling interest or outright ownership of the target company in order to implement changes that we believe are required to improve its business, and then operating and expanding that business. This activism has brought about very strong returns over the years.

Today, we are a diversified holding company owning subsidiaries engaged in the following operating businesses: Investment, Automotive, Energy, Gaming, Railcar, Food Packaging, Metals, Real Estate and Home Fashion. Through our Investment segment, we have significant positions in various investments, which include Netflix (NFLX), Chesapeake Energy (CHK), Hain Celestial Group (HAIN), Forest Laboratories (FRX) and Transocean Ltd. (RIG), as of February 27, 2013.

Our operating businesses often started out as investment positions in debt or equity securities, held either directly by Icahn Enterprises or Mr. Icahn. Those positions ultimately resulted in control or complete ownership of the target company. Most recently, we acquired a controlling interest in CVR Energy, Inc. (“CVR”) which started out as a position in our Investment segment and is now an operating subsidiary that comprises our Energy segment. As of February 27, 2013, based on the closing sale price of CVR stock and distribution since we acquired control, we have a gain of approximately $2 billion on our purchase of CVR. The recent acquisition of control of CVR, like our other operating subsidiaries, reflects our opportunistic approach to value creation, through which returns may be obtained by, among other things, promoting change through minority positions at targeted companies in our Investment segment or by acquiring control of those target companies that we believed we could run more profitably ourselves.

In 2000, we began to expand our business beyond our traditional real estate activities, and to fully embrace our activist strategy. On January 1, 2000, the closing sale price of our depositary units was $7.625 per depositary unit. On February 27, 2013, our depositary units closed $72.25 per depositary unit — a 1,003% increase since January 1, 2000, which translates to an annualized return of approximately 20% for those who owned the units through that period (including reinvestment of distributions into additional depositary units and taking into account in-kind distributions of depositary units). Comparatively, the S&P 500, Dow Jones Industrial and Russell 2000 indices increased approximately 32%, 68% and 115%, respectively, over the same period, which translates to an annualized return of approximately 2%, 4% and 6%, respectively (including reinvestment of distributions into those indices).

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During the next several years, we see a favorable opportunity to follow an activist strategy that centers on the purchase of target stock and the subsequent removal of any barriers that might interfere with a friendly purchase offer from a strong buyer. Alternatively, in appropriate circumstances, we or our subsidiaries may become the buyer of target companies, adding them to our portfolio of operating subsidiaries, thereby expanding our operations through such opportunistic acquisitions.

We believe that the companies that we target for our activist activities are undervalued for many reasons, often including inept management. Unfortunately for the individual investor, in particular, and the economy, in general, mediocre management teams are often unaccountable and very difficult to remove. There are too many costly roadblocks.

Unlike the individual investor, we have the wherewithal to purchase companies that we feel we can run more efficiently than incumbent management. In addition, through our Investment segment, we are in a position to pursue our activist strategy by purchasing stock or debt positions and trying to promulgate change through a variety of activist approaches, ranging from speaking and negotiating with the board and CEO to proxy fights to tender offers and to taking control. We work diligently to enhance value for all shareholders and we believe that the best way to do this is to make underperforming management teams and boards accountable or to replace them.

The Chairman of the Board of our general partner, Carl C. Icahn, has been an activist investor since 1980. Mr. Icahn believes that he has never seen a time for activism that is better than today. Many major companies have substantial amounts of cash. We believe that they are hoarding cash, rather than spending it, because they do not believe investments in their business will translate to earnings.

We believe that one of the best ways for many cash-rich companies to achieve increased earnings is to use their large amounts of excess cash, together with advantageous borrowing opportunities, to purchase other companies in their industries and take advantage of the meaningful synergies that could result. In our opinion, the CEOs and Boards of Directors of undervalued companies that would be acquisition targets are the major road blocks to this logical use of assets to increase value, because we believe those CEOs and Boards are not willing to give up their power and perquisites, even if they have done a poor job in administering the companies they have been running. In addition, acquirers are often unwilling to undertake the arduous task of launching a hostile campaign. This is precisely the situation in which a strong activist catalyst is necessary.

We believe that the activist catalyst adds value because, for companies with strong balance sheets, acquisition of their weaker industry rivals is often extremely compelling financially. We further believe that there are many transactions that make economic sense, even at a large premium over market. Acquirers can use their excess cash, that is earning a very low return, and/or borrow at the advantageous interest rates now available, to acquire a target company. In either case, an acquirer can add the target company’s earnings and the income from synergies to the acquirer’s bottom line, at relatively low cost. But for these potential acquirers to act, the target company must be willing to at least entertain an offer. We believe that often the activist can step in and remove the obstacles that a target may seek to use to prevent an acquisition.

It is our belief that our strategy will continue to produce strong results in 2013 and into the future, and that belief is reflected in the action of the Board of Directors of our general partner, which announced on February 11, 2013, to modify our distribution policy to increase our annual distribution to $4.00 per depositary unit. We believe that the strong cash flow and asset coverage from our operating subsidiaries will allow us to maintain a strong balance sheet and ample liquidity.

In our view Icahn Enterprises is in a virtuous cycle. By raising our distribution to our limited partners, and with the results we hope to achieve in 2013, we believe that our depositary units will give us another powerful activist tool, allowing us both to use our depositary units as currency for tender offers and acquisitions (both hostile and friendly) where appropriate, and to increase our fire power by raising additional cash through depositary unit sales, including this offering. All of these factors will, in our opinion, contribute to making our activism even more efficacious, which we expect to enhance our results and stock value and hopefully, the virtuous cycle will continue for many years.

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Overview

We are a diversified holding company owning subsidiaries engaged in the following operating businesses: Investment, Automotive, Energy, Gaming, Railcar, Food Packaging, Metals, Real Estate and Home Fashion.

Icahn Enterprises is a master limited partnership formed in Delaware on February 17, 1987. We own a 99% limited partner interest in Icahn Enterprises Holdings. Substantially all of our assets and liabilities are owned through Icahn Enterprises Holdings and substantially all of our operations are conducted through Icahn Enterprises Holdings and its subsidiaries. Icahn Enterprises G.P. Inc., or Icahn Enterprises GP, our sole general partner, owns a 1% general partner interest in both Icahn Enterprises Holdings and us, representing an aggregate 1.99% general partner interest in Icahn Enterprises Holdings and us. Icahn Enterprises GP is owned and controlled by Mr. Carl C. Icahn. As of December 31, 2012, affiliates of Mr. Icahn owned 97,764,251 of our depositary units that represented approximately 93.2% of our outstanding depositary units. Immediately after giving effect to the consummation of this offering, affiliates of Mr. Icahn will own   % of our depositary units (or   % of our depositary units, if the underwriter exercises its option to purchase additional depositary units in full).

Mr. Icahn’s estate has been designed to assure the stability and continuation of Icahn Enterprises with no need to monetize his interests for estate tax or other purposes. In the event of Mr. Icahn’s death, control of Mr. Icahn’s interests in Icahn Enterprises and its general partner will be placed in charitable and other trusts under the control of senior Icahn executives and family members.

The following is a summary of our core holdings:

Investment.  Our Investment segment is comprised of various private investment funds, including Icahn Partners LP, Icahn Partners Master Fund LP, Icahn Partners Master Fund II LP and Icahn Partners Master Fund III LP (the “Funds”), through which we invest our proprietary capital. We and certain of Mr. Icahn’s wholly owned affiliates are the sole investors in the Funds. Prior to March 31, 2011, interests in the Funds were offered to certain sophisticated and qualified investors on the basis of exemptions from the registration requirements of the federal securities laws and were not publicly available. The Funds returned all fee-paying capital to third-party investors during fiscal year 2011. This business derives revenues from gains and losses from our investments in the Funds.

Automotive.  We conduct our Automotive segment through our 77.6% ownership in Federal-Mogul Corporation (“Federal-Mogul”), a leading global supplier to the automotive, aerospace, energy, heavy duty truck, industrial, marine, power generation and railway industries. In 2012, Federal-Mogul reorganized its businesses around its Powertrain and Vehicle Components Solutions businesses to take advantage of disparate opportunities in each sector. Federal-Mogul’s high-precision products are designed and engineered to help its customers satisfy and exceed environmental and safety standards without sacrificing performance.

Federal-Mogul’s Powertrain business has leading market share positions in pistons, piston rings, valve seats, value guides, bearings, ignition and sealing products. It focuses on high-technology, high-precision products that improve fuel economy, reduce emissions and enhance engine durability. Demand for smaller, high-performance engines has increased dramatically over the past few years as developed economies implement higher fuel economy and emission standards and substantial growth in the size of the emerging markets middle class increases automotive demand. While global light vehicle cylinder count per engine will continue to decrease, these smaller engines require more advanced components to handle higher thermal and mechanical stresses, which increases overall content per vehicle. Approximately 30% of Powertrain revenue in fiscal year 2012 was derived from industrial and other non-light vehicle customers. Each of these markets is highly specialized and requires significant research, development and engineering to create products capable of performing in the harshest environments. These end markets are also subject to tightening environmental regulation that introduces increased complexity and performance requirements but creates opportunity for growth.

Federal-Mogul’s Vehicle Components Solutions business is a global leader in aftermarket components such as engine, sealing, chassis, wiper and ignition components, and is a leading premium brake pad and component

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manufacturer in North America and Europe. Federal-Mogul has some of the most widely recognized aftermarket brands, including Fel-Pro, Moog, Ferodo, ThermoQuiet, Wagner, ANCO and Champion. Aftermarket demand is a function of the size of the global car parc, which is estimated to grow at a 10% compound annual growth rate, or CAGR, through 2020 on the strength of emerging market vehicle sales. We believe Federal-Mogul has an excellent opportunity to leverage its brands and products throughout the emerging markets, as well as participate in consolidation opportunities in North America and Europe. In addition, the North American automotive aftermarket distribution system is both highly profitable and inefficient. As a large manufacturer with a broad product portfolio, Federal-Mogul has an opportunity to streamline its own distribution and expand into new distribution channels, such as the Internet, to capture more of the value chain.

Energy.  We conduct our Energy segment through our 82.0% ownership in CVR, in which we acquired a controlling interest on May 4, 2012. CVR is a holding company that owns majority interests in two separate operating subsidiaries, CVR Refining, LP (“CVRR”) and CVR Partners, LP (“CVRP”). CVRR is an independent petroleum refiner and marketer of high-value transportation fuels in the mid-continent of the United States, while CVRP is a leading nitrogen fertilizer producer in the heart of the Corn Belt.

CVRR’s mid-continent location provides access to significant quantities of crude oil from the continental United States and Western Canada. We believe expected crude oil production growth in North America, coupled with declining North Sea volumes, transportation bottlenecks and other geopolitical considerations will likely support favorable crack spreads for mid-continent refineries for the foreseeable future. CVRR’s refinery assets include two of only seven refineries in the underserved PADD II Group 3 region, a 115,000 barrels per day (“bpd”) complex full coking medium-sour crude refinery in Coffeyville, Kansas and a 70,000 bpd medium complexity refinery in Wynnewood, Oklahoma capable of processing 20,000 bpd of light sour crude. CVRR also controls and operates supporting logistics assets including approximately 350 miles of owned pipelines, over 125 owned crude transports, a network of strategically located crude oil gathering tank farms providing roughly 50,000 bpd to the refineries and over 6.0 million barrels of owned or leased crude oil storage capacity. In addition, CVRR has 35,000 bpd of contracted capacity on the Keystone and Spearhead pipelines to supply its refineries with Canadian and Bakken crudes.

CVRP produces and distributes nitrogen fertilizer products, such as ammonia and urea ammonium nitrate (“UAN”), used by farmers to improve the yield and quality of their crops. Located in the heart of the Corn Belt with direct access to its primary input, pet coke, from the adjacent Coffeyville refinery, CVRP is close to customers and enjoys a meaningful freight advantage compared to many of its competitors and imports. CVRP’s utilization of pet coke instead of natural gas provides CVRP with a relatively fixed cost structure and makes it less sensitive to swings in energy prices. Fertilizer consumption continues to grow annually as global population growth, changing food consumption patterns in emerging markets and decreasing per capita farmland drive world grain demand higher and necessitate more efficient land use. The United States currently accounts for 26% of world coarse grain production, and as the third largest consumer of nitrogen fertilizer, imports approximately 41% of its requirements. As a result of these trends and the recent completion of its UAN expansion project, we believe CVRP is well positioned to continue to benefit from the secular growth in the fertilizer market.

Gaming.  We conduct our Gaming segment through our 67.9% ownership in Tropicana Entertainment Inc. (“Tropicana”). Tropicana currently owns and operates a diversified, multi-jurisdictional collection of casino gaming properties. The eight casino facilities it operates feature approximately 380,600 square feet of gaming space with 7,121 slot machines, 231 table games and 6,046 hotel rooms with three casino facilities located in Nevada and one in each of Mississippi, Indiana, Louisiana, New Jersey and Aruba. We acquired our ownership in Tropicana through distressed debt and subsequent equity purchases. In 2010, Tropicana emerged from bankruptcy following which we replaced management and improved performance.

Through a highly analytical approach to operations, Tropicana management has identified programs that are designed to enhance marketing, improve hotel utilization, optimize product mix and reduce expenses. Tropicana has also reinvested in its properties by upgrading hotel rooms, refreshing casino floor products tailored for each regional market and pursuing strong brands for restaurant and retail opportunities. Tropicana intends to pursue acquisition opportunities where it can expand into attractive regional markets and leverage

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the Tropicana brand name and customer base. In addition, we are monitoring the prospects of Internet gaming and intend to pursue the opportunity if and when it is legalized.

Railcar.  We conduct our Railcar segment primarily through our 55.6% ownership in American Railcar Industries Inc. (“ARI”). ARI is a leading manufacturer of hopper and tank railcars, two product groups that constitute over 50% of the 1.5 million railcar North American fleet, 65% of 2012 railcar deliveries and 88% of the railcar industry manufacturing backlog as of December 31, 2012. These railcars are offered for sale or lease to leasing companies, industrial companies, shippers and Class I railroads. ARI currently benefits from the rapidly increasing energy production in North America. Increased crude oil production from North American shale regions and Canada have resulted in significant demand for tank railcars as the existing pipeline capacity is not able to satisfy the transportation demands for crude oil. ARI’s capacity for tank railcar production is completely booked for 2013 and industry new tank railcar order backlogs extend well into the third quarter of 2014. ARI has a railcar fleet for lease of approximately 2,590 railcars, and we also operate a separate lease fleet through our indirect wholly owned subsidiary AEP Leasing LLC.

ARI also provides end-to-end management services for railcar fleets including critical railcar repair, maintenance, engineering and reporting services. ARI also manufactures other industrial products, primarily aluminum and special alloy steel castings.

In addition, ARI provides fleet management, maintenance, engineering and field services for railcars owned by certain customers. Such services include maintenance planning, project management, tracking and tracing, regulatory compliance, mileage audit, rolling stock taxes and online service access.

Food Packaging.  We conduct our Food Packaging segment through our 70.8% ownership in Viskase Companies, Inc. (“Viskase”). Viskase is a worldwide leader in the production and sale of cellulosic, fibrous and plastic casings for the processed meat and poultry industry. Viskase currently operates eight manufacturing facilities and ten distribution centers throughout North America, Europe, South America and Asia and derives approximately 70% of its total net sales from customers located outside the United States. Viskase believes it is one of the two largest manufacturers of non-edible cellulosic casings for processed meats and one of the three largest manufacturers of non-edible fibrous casings.

While developed markets remain a steady source of demand for Viskase’s products, we believe that future growth will be driven significantly by the growing middle class in emerging markets. As per capita income increases in these emerging economies, we expect protein consumption to increase. This creates significant demand for meat-related products, such as sausages, hot dogs and luncheon meats, which are some of the most affordable sources of protein and represent the primary sources of demand for Viskase casings.

Viskase is aggressively pursuing this emerging market opportunity. Since 2007, sales to emerging economies have grown on average 13% per year and now account for almost 50% of total company sales compared to 36% in 2007. In 2012, Viskase completed a new finishing center in the Philippines and expanded its capacity in Brazil. Artificial casings are technically difficult to make and the challenges to producing quality casings that meet stringent food-related regulatory requirements are significant. In addition, there are large barriers to entry in building the manufacturing facilities and obtaining the regulatory permits necessary to meaningfully participate in the industry. Viskase had invested approximately $116 million of capital from 2009 through September 2012 to meet the increasing emerging market demand. A significant portion of that investment was made in 2011 and 2012 and therefore the financial returns on investment will not be evident until 2013.

Metals.  We conduct our Metals segment through our indirect wholly owned subsidiary, PSC Metals, Inc. (“PSC Metals”). PSC Metals is one of the largest independent metal recycling companies in the United States and collects industrial and obsolete scrap metal, processes it into reusable forms and supplies the recycled metals to its customers including electric-arc furnace mills, integrated steel mills, foundries, secondary smelters and metals brokers. PSC Metals has nearly 50 locations concentrated in three main geographic regions—the Upper Midwest, the St. Louis region and the South. PSC Metals has actively consolidated its regions and is building a leading position in each market.

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As recycled steel is more environmentally friendly and energy efficient (and therefore cheaper to produce) than virgin steel, we believe that PSC Metals will benefit from secular growth trends in recycled metals. In addition, PSC Metals is well positioned to benefit from the improving economy and higher industrial production and steel mill operating rates in North America. North American steel production growth is expected to be approximately 5% in 2013. In our Upper Midwest market, steel mills in Ohio will have invested approximately $1.9 billion between 2011-2014 to meet growing steel demand driven primarily by automotive and increased oil and gas drilling industries. We believe these investments will increase the already strong regional demand for ferrous scrap. Finally, as the United States is the leading exporter of scrap metal in the world, the U.S. scrap industry is expected to benefit from growing global steel demand.

PSC Metals also processes non-ferrous metals including aluminum, aluminum ingots, copper, brass, stainless steel and nickel-bearing metals. Non-ferrous products are a significant raw material in the production of aluminum and copper alloys used in manufacturing. PSC Metals also operates a secondary products business that includes the supply of secondary plate and structural grade pipe that is sold into niche markets for counterweights, piling and foundations, construction materials and infrastructure end-markets.

Real Estate.  Our Real Estate segment consists of rental real estate, property development and resort activities. As of December 31, 2012, we owned 29 rental commercial real estate properties. Our property development operations are run primarily through Bayswater Development LLC, a real estate investment, management and development subsidiary that focuses primarily on the construction and sale of single-family and multi-family homes, lots in subdivisions and planned communities and raw land for residential development. Our New Seabury development property in Cape Cod, Massachusetts and our Grand Harbor and Oak Harbor development property in Vero Beach, Florida include land for future residential development of approximately 322 and 870 units of residential housing, respectively. Both developments operate golf and resort operations as well.

Home Fashion.  We conduct our Home Fashion segment through our indirect wholly owned subsidiary WestPoint Home LLC (“WPH”), a manufacturer and distributor of home fashion consumer products. WPH is engaged in the business of manufacturing, sourcing, designing, marketing, distributing and selling home fashion consumer products. WPH markets a broad range of manufactured and sourced bed, bath and basic bedding products, including, sheets, pillowcases, bedspreads, quilts, comforters and duvet covers, feather beds, bath and beach towels, bath accessories, bed skirts, bed pillows, flocked blankets, woven blankets and throws, and mattress pads. WPH recognizes revenue primarily through the sale of home fashion products to a variety of retail and institutional customers. We acquired our interest in WPH in 2005 through a purchase of distressed debt. Since its emergence from bankruptcy, we have completely restructured its manufacturing footprint moving our plants to low cost countries, discontinued unprofitable programs, and right sized our overhead structure. WPH owns many of the most well-known brands in home textiles including Martex, Grand Patrician, Luxor and Vellux. WPH also manufactures products for Ralph Lauren and under licensed brands such as Izod, Portico, Under the Canopy, and Southern Tide for home textile products.

Business Strengths

Significant Net Asset Value.  We are well capitalized with approximately $24.3 billion of assets at September 30, 2012, and significant equity value in our operating subsidiaries. The table below sets forth the combined value of our operating subsidiaries and Holding Company’s liquid assets.

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Our net asset value is summarized as follows (in millions):

 
Market-valued subsidiaries:
        
Holding Company interests in Funds(1)   $ 2,598  
CVR(2)     3,966  
CVRR(3)     118  
Federal-Mogul(4)     648  
American Railcar Industries(4)     508  
Total market-valued subsidiaries   $ 7,838  
Other subsidiaries:
        
Tropicana(5)   $ 505  
Viskase(5)     226  
Real Estate Holdings(6)     746  
PSC Metals(6)     396  
WPH(6)     266  
Total – other subsidiaries   $ 2,139  
Add: Holding Company cash and cash equivalents(7)     1,338  
Less: Holding Company debt(8)     (4,084 ) 
Add: Other Holding Company net assets(9)   $ 43  
Total   $ 7,274  

(1) Fair market value of Holding Company’s interest in the Funds as of February 27, 2013.
(2) Based on closing share price as of February 27, 2013 and number of shares owned by the Holding Company.
(3) The Holding Company purchased four million common units of CVRR at the initial public offering price of $25.00. As of February 27, 2013, CVRR had a closing share price of $29.52 per unit.
(4) Based on closing share price as of February 27, 2013 and number of shares owned by the Holding Company.
(5) Amounts based on market comparables due to lack of material trading volume. Tropicana valued at 8.0x EBITDA for the last twelve months ended September 30, 2012 of $87 million and Viskase valued at 11.0x EBITDA for the last twelve months ended September 30, 2012 of $46 million. As of September 30, 2012, Tropicana had debt of $171 million and unrestricted cash of $250 million and Viskase had $216 million of debt and unrestricted cash of $26 million.
(6) Represents equity attributable to us as of September 30, 2012.
(7) Holding Company cash and cash equivalents is as of September 30, 2012, less the $100 million investment in CVRR’s initial public offering, which is reflected in market-valued subsidiaries. Amount includes effect of CVR special dividend of $5.50 per share, paid on February 19, 2013, to shareholders of record at the close of business on February 5, 2013.
(8) Represents Holding Company debt as of September 30, 2012.
(9) Represents other Holding Company net assets as of September 30, 2012.

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Diversified Operating Subsidiaries with Strong Financial Position.  We have operating subsidiaries in diverse industries including Investment, Automotive, Energy, Railcar, Food Packaging, Metals, Real Estate and Home Fashion. On a pro forma basis giving effect to the CVR acquisition and CVR’s acquisition of the Wynnewood refinery, for the nine month period ended September 30, 2012, we generated revenues of $14.0 billion, consolidated Adjusted EBITDA before non-controlling interests of $1.9 billion, and Adjusted EBITDA attributable to Icahn Enterprises of $1.4 billion. A  reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA attributable to Icahn Enterprises to net income attributable to Icahn Enterprises is included in “—Summary Consolidated Historical and Pro Forma Financial Data.” Furthermore, with over $1.0 billion of cash at our holding company, $2.3 billion liquid interest in the Funds, and over $2.0 billion of cash at our subsidiary operating companies all as of September 30, 2012, we have strong liquidity to fund operating needs, strategic initiatives and attractive investment opportunities.

Proven Investment Team.  Our investment team is led by Carl C. Icahn, working with a team of experienced financial and operational executives. Mr. Icahn’s substantial investing history provides us with a unique network of relationships and access on Wall Street, in industry and throughout the restructuring community. Our team consists of nearly 20 professionals with diverse backgrounds, most of whom have worked with us for many years. Our team maintains a deep knowledge of business systems, bankruptcy laws and transaction processes that further supports our efforts to build stakeholder value.

Significant Investment Realizations.  We have demonstrated a history of successfully acquiring undervalued assets and improving and enhancing their operations and financial results. Our investment record is based on a long-term investment horizon that enhances business value and facilitates a profitable exit strategy. For example, in 2006, we sold our oil and gas assets to a strategic buyer for $1.5 billion resulting in a pre-tax gain of $599 million. Our oil and gas assets included National Energy Group, Inc., TransTexas Gas Corporation and Panaco, Inc., which were acquired out of bankruptcy. Subsequently, we grew the business through organic investment and through a series of bolt-on acquisitions. In addition, we installed operational and financial guidelines to improve the business, including realignment of the fixed asset cost structure, reserve life expansion by maintaining a highly successful drilling program and implementation of internal controls.

We have applied our investment expertise in other distressed situations, such as the consolidation of American Casino & Entertainment Properties LLC (“ACEP”). ACEP’s properties in Las Vegas, which included Stratosphere Casino Hotel & Tower, Arizona Charlie’s Decatur and Arizona Charlie’s Boulder, were acquired through bankruptcy at a substantial discount to replacement cost, and we immediately took managerial and operational steps to reduce operating costs and reinvested in the assets to enhance value. Notably, we provided capital to complete a 1,000 room expansion at the Stratosphere and made significant investments at each of the properties to refurbish rooms. We also grew ACEP by acquiring and upgrading the Acquarius in Laughlin, Nevada. Our investment cycle in ACEP spanned many years. We sold our investment in 2008 through a sale of the casinos to W2007/ACEP Holdings, LLC, an affiliate of Whitehall Street Real Estate Funds, a series of real estate funds affiliated with Goldman Sachs & Co., which resulted in proceeds of $1.2 billion and a pre-tax gain of $732 million. We reinvested $465 million of proceeds from this sale to acquire two triple net leased properties, which have been leased to a single-A-rated public company whose market capitalization exceeds $150 billion. These assets have generated annual cash flow of over $32 million.

Business Strategy

We believe that our core strengths include: identifying and acquiring undervalued assets and businesses, often through the purchase of distressed securities; increasing value through management, financial or other operational changes; and managing complex legal, regulatory or financial issues, which may include bankruptcy or insolvency, environmental, zoning, permitting and licensing issues.

The key elements of our business strategy include the following:

Capitalize on Growth Opportunities in our Existing Businesses.  We believe that we have developed a strong portfolio of businesses with experienced management teams. We may expand our existing businesses if appropriate opportunities are identified, as well as use our established businesses as a platform for additional acquisitions in the same or related areas.

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Drive Accountability and Financial Discipline in the Management of Our Businesses.  Our Principal Executive Officer is accountable directly to our board of directors, including the Chairman, Mr. Carl. C. Icahn, and has day-to-day responsibility, in consultation with our Chairman, for general oversight of our business segments. We continually evaluate our operating subsidiaries with a view towards maximizing value and cost efficiencies, bringing an owner’s perspective to our operating businesses. In each of these businesses, we assemble senior management teams with the expertise to run their businesses and boards of directors to oversee the management of those businesses. Each management team is responsible for the day-to-day operations of their businesses and directly accountable to its board of directors.

Seek to Acquire Undervalued Assets.  We intend to continue to make investments in businesses that we believe are undervalued and have potential for growth. We also seek to capitalize on investment opportunities arising from market inefficiencies, economic or market trends that have not been identified and reflected in market value, or complex or special situations. Certain opportunities may arise from companies that experience disappointing financial results, liquidity or capital needs, lowered credit ratings, revised industry forecasts or legal complications. We may acquire businesses or assets directly or we may establish an ownership position through the purchase of debt or equity securities in the open market or in privately negotiated transactions.

Recent Developments

Preliminary Unaudited Selected Financial and Other Data for Fiscal Year 2012

The preliminary financial data discussed below has been prepared by, and is the responsibility of, Icahn Enterprises’ management. We and certain of our operating subsidiaries have not yet finalized the financial statement close process for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012. Our and certain of our operating subsidiaries’ independent auditors have not yet completed their year-end audits nor have they reviewed, compiled or performed any procedures with respect to the accompanying preliminary financial data. Accordingly, they do not express an opinion or any other form of assurance with respect thereto. In connection with the completion of these activities, we or they may identify items that would require us or them to make adjustments to certain preliminary operating results set forth below. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from our preliminary estimates are set forth under the headings “Risk Factors” and “Forward-Looking Statements.” Therefore, our actual results may differ materially from these estimates. Our consolidated financial statements, ARI’s consolidated financial statements, CVR Energy Inc.’s consolidated financial statements, CVR Refining, LP’s combined financial statements, and CVR Partners, LP’s consolidated financial statements, each as of and for the year ended December 31, 2012 will not be issued or filed until after this offering is completed, and consequently, will not be available to you prior to investing in this offering.

In addition, we have included Adjusted EBITDA for us and certain of our operating subsidiaries in this prospectus for the reasons as described in “—Summary Consolidated Historical and Pro Forma Financial Data.” Adjusted EBITDA has limitations as an analytical tool in that it does not reflect all expense items that affect our results. These and other limitations are described in “—Summary Consolidated Historical and Pro Forma Financial Data.” We encourage you to review our financial information in its entirety.

We have provided ranges for certain of the preliminary results described above primarily because our financial statement close process for the year ended December 31, 2012 is not yet complete. As a result, there is a possibility that our final results will vary from these preliminary estimates. We currently expect that our final results will be within the ranges described above. It is possible, however, that our final results will not be within the ranges described above. We expect to complete our closing procedures for the year ended December 31, 2012 in March 2013.

Icahn Enterprises LP.  Based on preliminary operating results for the year ended December 31, 2012, revenue is expected to be approximately $15.6 billion, Adjusted EBITDA attributable to Icahn Enterprises is estimated to be $1.5 billion and net income attributable to Icahn Enterprises is expected to be approximately $350 million, subject to year-end tax adjustments, or $3.30 per depositary unit compared to revenues of $11.9 billion, net income attributable to Icahn Enterprises of $750 million, or $8.33 per depositary unit and Adjusted EBITDA attributable to Icahn Enterprises of $1.5 billion for the year ended December 31, 2011.

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The principal cause of the decrease in Icahn Enterprises’ net income in 2012 as compared to 2011 was lower returns by the Investment Funds, which experienced a 34.5% aggregate return in 2011. At the time we acquired control of CVR in May 2012, we distributed the shares of CVR outside the Investment Funds to our subsidiary, IEP Energy LLC. As a result, the stock price appreciation CVR experienced from May 2012 through year-end was not reflected in our Investment segment’s operating results. In addition, one of CVR’s refineries went through a comprehensive turnaround in the fourth quarter of 2012. The downtime associated with the turnaround and $102 million of turnaround costs also adversely affected our operating results.

CVR Energy Inc.  Based on preliminary operating results for the year ended December 31, 2012, CVR’s net sales is expected to be between $8.5 billion and $8.6 billion and Adjusted EBITDA is expected to be approximately $1.3 billion, compared to net sales of $5.0 billion and Adjusted EBITDA of $685 million for the year ended December 31, 2011.

CVR’s net sales increase was primarily due to an increase in petroleum sales that resulted from significantly higher sales volumes in 2012. The increase in sales volumes was largely the result of inclusion of a full year’s results in 2012 of the Wynnewood refinery which was acquired by CVR on December 15, 2011.

The increase in Adjusted EBITDA was due largely to an increase in refining margins at CVRR during fiscal year 2012. The increase in refining margins was due to the inclusion of a full year of results for the Wynnewood refinery, increases in average sales prices per gallon for gasoline and distillates of approximately 1.5% and 1.8%, respectively, and a decrease in consumed crude oil costs. The increase in refining margins was partially offset by increased operating costs associated with the operation of the Wynnewood refinery in 2012 and realized losses on derivatives.

The following table sets forth a reconciliation of net income (loss) to Adjusted EBITDA for CVR for the periods indicated below (in millions):

     
  December 31, 2011   December 31, 2012
Estimated
     Low   High
       (unaudited)
Consolidated net income (loss) attributable to CVR Energy   $ 346     $ 376     $ 388  
Interest expense, net of interest income     55       76       73  
Depreciation and amortization     90       132       128  
Income tax expense (benefit)     209       216       223  
EBITDA adjustments included in non-controlling interest     (5 )      (7 )      (7 ) 
EBITDA   $ 695     $ 793     $ 805  
FIFO impact (favorable) unfavorable     (26 )      59       57  
Unrealized (gain)/loss on derivatives     (85 )      149       147  
Share-based compensation     27       40       38  
Loss on disposal of fixed asset     3              
Loss on extinguishment of debt     2       38       37  
Major scheduled turnaround     66       129       127  
Expenses related to proxy matter           44       44  
Expenses related to Gary Williams acquisition     5       11       11  
Expenses related to non-controlling interest     (2 )      (4 )      (4 ) 
Adjusted EBITDA   $ 685     $ 1,259     $ 1,262  

Set forth below are estimated 2012 operating results for CVR’s petroleum refining and fertilizer segments.

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CVR Refining, LP.  Based on preliminary operating results for the year ended December 31, 2012, CVRR’s net sales is expected to be between $8.2 billion and $8.3 billion and Adjusted EBITDA is expected to be approximately $1.2 billion, compared to net sales of $4.8 billion and Adjusted EBITDA of $577 million for the year ended December 31, 2011.

The following table sets forth a reconciliation of net income (loss) to Adjusted EBITDA for CVRR for the periods indicated below (in millions):

     
  December 31, 2011   December 31, 2012
Estimated
     Low   High
     (unaudited)
Net income   $ 480     $ 585     $ 604  
Interest expense, net of interest income     53       78       75  
Depreciation and amortization     70       110       106  
Income tax expense (benefit)                  
EBITDA adjustments included in non-controlling interests                  
EBITDA   $ 603     $ 773     $ 785  
FIFO impact (favorable) unfavorable     (26 )      59       57  
Unrealized (gain)/loss on derivatives     (85 )      149       147  
Share-based compensation     9       20       18  
Loss on disposal of fixed asset     3              
Loss on extinguishment of debt     2       38       37  
Major scheduled turnaround     66       125       123  
Expenses related to acquisition     5       11       11  
Adjusted EBITDA   $ 577     $ 1,175     $ 1,178  

CVRR expects to report total crude oil throughput for the year ended December 31, 2012 of approximately 169,400 bpd comprised of approximately 114,800 bpd for the Coffeyville refinery and approximately 54,600 bpd for the Wynnewood refinery. This compares to total crude oil throughput of 100,600 bpd for the Coffeyville refinery and 61,800 bpd for the Wynnewood refinery during the year ended December 31, 2011. CVR acquired the Wynnewood refinery on December 16, 2011. The total crude oil throughput during 2011 and 2012 were impacted by the turnaround of the Coffeyville refinery in the fourth quarter of 2011 and first quarter of 2012 and the turnaround of the Wynnewood refinery in the fourth quarter of 2012. The downtime associated with the Wynnewood turnaround, which was completed in December 2012 at a cost of $102 million, significantly impacted CVRR’s results of operations in the fourth quarter of 2012.

In connection with the initial public offering of CVRR’s common units that was completed on January 16, 2013, CVRR projected net sales of $7.8 billion, operating income of $845 million, net income of $807 million and Adjusted EBITDA of $900 million in the year ended December 31, 2013. This forecast was based on numerous assumptions, including assumptions relating to total crude oil throughput and refining margins. The forecasted NYMEX 2:1:1 crack spread has widened since the time of CVRR’s initial public offering. Management of CVRR continues to believe that its estimates are reasonable and that CVRR will meet or exceed its forecasted financial results. However, the assumptions and estimates underlying the forecasted financial results are inherently uncertain and are subject to change as a result of a variety of factors.

CVR Partners, LP.   On February 27, 2012 CVRP announced for the year ended December 31, 2012, it had net sales of $302 million and Adjusted EBITDA of $148 million compared to net sales of $303 million and Adjusted EBITDA of $162 million for the year ended December 31, 2011.

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The following table sets forth a reconciliation of net income (loss) to Adjusted EBITDA for CVRP for the periods indicated below (in millions):

   
  December 31,
2011
  December 31,
2012
     (unaudited)
Net income (loss)   $ 132     $ 112  
Interest expense, net of interest income     4       3  
Depreciation and amortization     19       21  
EBITDA   $ 155     $ 136  
Share-based compensation     7       7  
Major scheduled turnaround           5  
Adjusted EBITDA   $ 162     $ 148  

CVRP’s 2012 production levels and operating results were impacted by a scheduled major biennial turnaround which occurred in October 2012, during which the plant was down for approximately three weeks to perform scheduled repairs and maintenance.

For the year ended December 31, 2012, average realized plant gate prices for ammonia and UAN were $613 per ton and $303 per ton, respectively, compared to $579 per ton and $284 per ton, respectively, for the year ended December 31, 2011.

CVRP produced 390,000 tons of ammonia during the year ended December 31, 2012, of which 124,600 net tons were available for sale while the rest was upgraded to 643,800 tons of more highly valued UAN. During the year ended December 31, 2011, the plant produced 411,200 tons of ammonia with 116,800 net tons available for sale with the remainder upgraded to 714,100 tons of UAN. Since the conclusion of the third quarter, CVRP has completed the construction of its UAN plant expansion project, which is expected to achieve full production rates in March of 2013. Because UAN is a higher margin product, the UAN plant expansion project and no turnaround in 2013 are expected to generate an increase in CVRP’s cash available for distribution for 2013 as compared to 2012.

Federal-Mogul Corp.  On February 27, 2013, Federal-Mogul announced for the year ended December 31, 2012, it had net sales and Adjusted EBITDA of approximately $6.7 billion and $508 million respectively, compared with net sales and Adjusted EBITDA of $6.9 billion and $683 million for the year ended December 31, 2011, respectively. Excluded from the Adjusted EBITDA  of $508 million is $25 million of charges comprised of a $10 million commercial agreement with a customer, $9 million from a legal and contractual settlement and $6 million in expense associated with a payment to Federal-Mogul’s retired CEO, Jose Maria Alapont. Approximately 61% of Federal-Mogul’s net sales are non-dollar denominated and more than 50% of Federal-Mogul’s Powertrain segment sales of approximately $4 billion are derived from Europe. Compared to other geographic regions, sales in Europe consist of a greater percentage of high-content diesel engines, which generally have higher operating margins than non-diesel products. Federal-Mogul’s results in 2012 were significantly impacted by reductions in light and commercial vehicle production in Europe, combined with weaker international currencies, especially the euro, versus the dollar.

During the second quarter of 2012, Federal-Mogul commenced a restructuring of its North American friction and wiper operations, involving three plant closures and one significant site downsizing. Federal-Mogul has also been evaluating a broader restructuring that would reduce its cost structure, realign its manufacturing footprint and streamline operations. This plan would likely involve the closure of several additional facilities in high cost regions and shifting capacity and equipment to existing and new lower cost sites in Eastern Europe, Asia and Mexico. Management believes that its restructuring actions will improve the long-term competitiveness of Federal-Mogul and lead to improved operating margins, particularly as vehicle production volumes improve in Europe. Federal-Mogul has not finalized the restructuring plan or the associated costs.

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The following tables set forth a reconciliation of net loss to Adjusted EBITDA for Federal-Mogul for the periods indicated below (in millions):

   
  December 31,
     2011   2012
     (unaudited)
Net loss   $ (83 )    $ (110 ) 
Depreciation and amortization     284       289  
Income tax expense (benefit)     17       (29 ) 
Interest expense, net     127       128  
EBITDA   $ 345     $ 278  
Adjustments of assets to fair value     307       194  
Non-service cost components associated with the U.S. based funded pension plan     25       35  
Restructuring expense, net     5       26  
OPEB curtailment gains     (1 )      (51 ) 
Other     2       26  
Adjusted EBITDA   $ 683     $ 508  

Investment Funds.  The Investment Funds' implied aggregate return was approximately 20.2% in fiscal year 2012, including the full year impact of our investment in CVR. We acquired control of CVR in May 2012. At that time, we distributed the shares of CVR from the Investment Funds to our subsidiary, IEP Energy LLC. Excluding investment gains in CVR following its distribution to IEP Energy LLC, the Investment Funds had an actual return of approximately 6.6% in 2012. During fiscal year 2012, gains were primarily due to our long exposure to the equity markets driven by certain core holdings, including CVR (before distribution to IEP Energy LLC), which were offset in part by our defensive short positions. The Investment Funds' aggregate return was 34.5% for fiscal year 2011. During fiscal year 2011, gains were primarily due to returns on certain core holdings, including Motorola Mobility, Motorola Solutions, El Paso Corp and Biogen.

The Investment Funds' aggregate gross return for the period of January 1, 2013 through the close of business on February 27, 2013 was approximately 9.2%. Since inception in November 2004, the Funds’ gross return is 198%, representing an annualized rate of return of 14% as of February 27, 2013. Assets under management were approximately $6.4 billion, of which our interests were $2.6 billion, as of the close of business on February 27, 2013.

American Railcar Industries Inc.  On February 20, 2013, ARI announced for the year ended December 31, 2012, it had revenue of $712 million and Adjusted EBITDA of $150 million, compared to revenue of $519 million and Adjusted EBITDA of $50 million for the year ended December 31, 2011. ARI shipped approximately 7,880 railcars to customers for the fiscal year 2012, compared to 5,230 railcars in 2011. Included in these shipments were railcars shipped to leasing customers of approximately 2,100 for 2012 and 350 for 2011.

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The following tables set forth a reconciliation of net income to Adjusted EBITDA for ARI for the periods indicated below (in millions):

   
  December 31,
     2011   2012
     (unaudited)
Net income   $ 4     $ 64  
Depreciation and amortization     22       24  
Income tax expense     4       42  
Interest expense     20       18  
EBITDA   $ 50     $ 148  
Stock based compensation     4       5  
Loss on debt extinguishment           2  
Other     (4 )      (5 ) 
Adjusted EBITDA   $ 50     $ 150  

At December 31, 2012, ARI had orders for railcars in its backlog of 7,060 railcars which will be produced in 2013 and 2014, compared to a backlog of approximately 6,530 railcars as of December 31, 2011. A substantial majority of the backlog at the end of 2012 is orders for tank railcars, and a significant portion of those orders are railcars to service the crude oil transportation market. As of December 31, 2012, ARI had a lease fleet of approximately 2,590 relatively new, with most built in 2011 and in 2012, covered hopper and tank railcars, which are on lease to several of ARI’s customers and are transporting many different commodities. ARI also has a railcar repair and services business with revenues included above of approximately $60 million annually.

Our Corporate Information

Our principal executive offices are located at 767 Fifth Avenue, Suite 4700, New York, New York 10153 and our telephone number is (212) 702-4300. Our Internet address is www.ielp.com. We are not including the information contained on or available through our website as a part of, or incorporating such information by reference into, this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus.

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The Offering

Depositary units offered by us    
         depositary units;      depositary units if the underwriter exercises in full its option to purchase additional depositary units.
Depositary units outstanding after this offering    
         depositary units;      depositary units if the underwriter exercises in full its option to purchase additional depositary units.
Use of proceeds    
    We estimate that the net proceeds to us from this offering, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses, will be approximately $     million (or approximately $      million if the underwriter exercises in full its option to purchase additional depositary units).
    We intend to use the net proceeds from this offering and from the underwriter’s exercise of its option to purchase additional depositary units, if any, for general partnership purposes, which may include investments in our operating subsidiaries and potential acquisitions, in accordance with our investment strategy.
Distribution policy    
    On February 10, 2013, the board of directors of the Company’s general partner, Icahn Enterprises GP, set an annual distribution of $4.00 per depositary unit, payable in either cash or additional depositary units, at the election of each depositary unit holder.
    On February 10, 2013, the board of directors of Icahn Enterprises GP declared a quarterly distribution of $1.00 per depositary unit, payable in cash or additional depositary units. The distribution will be paid on or about April 15, 2013 to depositary unitholders of record at the close of business on February 21, 2013. The cut-off date for brokers or nominees to advise our transfer agent, Registrar and Transfer Company of their payment election is March 14, 2013. We will calculate the depositary units to be distributed to depositary unitholders based on the 20 trading day volume weighted average price of our depositary units immediately following the cut-off date. To the extent that the aggregate units to be distributed to any holder would include a fraction of a unit, that fractional unit will be settled in cash.
Exchange listing    
    Our depositary units are traded on The NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “IEP.”
Material U.S. federal income tax considerations    
    For a discussion of material U.S. federal income tax considerations that may be relevant to potential holders of our depositary units, please read “Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations.”

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Risk factors    
    You should carefully consider the information set forth under “Risk Factors” beginning on page S-23 of this prospectus supplement and page 3 of the accompanying prospectus, as well as the documents we previously have filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission that are incorporated by reference herein, before making an investment in our depositary units.

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SUMMARY CONSOLIDATED HISTORICAL AND PRO FORMA FINANCIAL DATA

Historical

The following tables contain our selected consolidated financial data, which should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and the related notes thereto, and Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations contained in our Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the nine months ended September 30, 2012 and our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011. The selected consolidated financial data as of September 30, 2012 and for the nine months ended September 30, 2012 and 2011 have been derived from our unaudited consolidated financial statements contained in our Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, filed with the SEC on November 7, 2012. The selected consolidated financial data as of December 31, 2011 and 2010 and for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements contained in our Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC on March 12, 2012. Additionally, basic and diluted income (loss) per depositary unit has been adjusted retrospectively for all applicable periods to reflect the additional depositary units issued as unit distributions on May 31, 2011, March 30, 2012, May 31, 2012 and August 31, 2012. The financial data presented below is not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for any future periods and the financial data presented for the interim periods is not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the full year.

Pro Forma

The following tables contain unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial data for the nine months ended September 30, 2011 and 2012 and for the year ended December 31, 2011 giving effect to our acquisition of a controlling interest in CVR, including the pro forma adjustments related to the Wynnewood acquisition by CVR on December 15, 2011, as if they had occurred on January 1, 2011. This summary unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial data should be read together with our consolidated financial statements and the related notes thereto, Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, both described above, and the unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information and the related notes thereto contained in our Current Report on Form 8-K/A, filed with the SEC on July 9, 2012 and incorporated by reference herein, and the consolidated financial statements of CVR Energy, which are filed with the SEC.

The preliminary allocation of the purchase price of CVR used in the unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial statements is based upon preliminary estimates. The estimates are subject to change upon completion of the valuation of CVR's assets and liabilities. Upon completion of the purchase price allocation, we expect to make additional adjustments, and these valuations could change significantly from those used in the pro forma condensed combined financial statements below and incorporated by reference herein. Therefore, actual adjustments may differ materially from the pro forma adjustments.

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information does not purport to be indicative of the financial position and results of operations that Icahn Enterprises will obtain in the future, or that Icahn Enterprises would have obtained if the acquisition of the controlling interest in CVR had been consummated as of the dates indicated above.

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  Year Ended December 31,   Nine Months
Ended
September 30,
     2009   2010   2011   2011   2012
     (in millions)   (unaudited)
Statement of Operations Data:
                                            
Net sales   $ 6,760     $ 7,904     $ 9,128     $ 6,887     $ 10,625  
Other revenues from operations     139       227       770       591       611  
Net gain from investment activities     1,406       814       1,905       1,158       255  
Income from continuing operations     1,224       744       1,764       1,128       651  
Income (loss) from discontinued operations     1       (1 )                   
Net income     1,225       743       1,764       1,128       651  
Less: Net income attributable to non-controlling interests     (972 )      (544 )      (1,014 )      (638 )      (273 ) 
Net income attributable to Icahn Enterprises   $ 253     $ 199     $ 750     $ 490     $ 378  
Net income attributable to Icahn Enterprises allocable to:
                                            
Limited partners   $ 229     $ 195     $ 735     $ 480     $ 361  
General partner     24       4       15       10       17  
Net income attributable to Icahn Enterprises   $ 253     $ 199     $ 750     $ 490     $ 378  
Net income (loss) attributable to Icahn Enterprises from:
                                            
Continuing operations   $ 252     $ 200     $ 750     $ 490     $ 378  
Discontinued operations     1       (1 )                   
Net income attributable to Icahn Enterprises   $ 253     $ 199     $ 750     $ 490     $ 378  
Basic income (loss) per LP unit:
                                            
Income from continuing operations   $ 2.96     $ 2.28     $ 8.45     $ 5.52     $ 3.61  
Income (loss) from discontinued operations     0.01       (0.01 )      0.00       0.00       0.00  
Basic income per LP unit   $ 2.97     $ 2.27     $ 8.45     $ 5.52     $ 3.61  
Basic weighted average LP units outstanding     77       86       87       87       100  
Diluted income (loss) per LP unit:
                                            
Income from continuing operations   $ 2.89     $ 2.27     $ 8.24     $ 5.40     $ 3.60  
Income (loss) from discontinued operations     0.01       (0.01 )      0.00       0.00       0.00  
Diluted income per LP unit   $ 2.90     $ 2.26     $ 8.24     $ 5.40     $ 3.60  
Diluted weighted average LP units outstanding     81       87       92       92       105  

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  Year Ended December 31,   Nine Months
Ended
September 30,
     2009   2010   2011   2011   2012
     (in millions)   (unaudited)
Statement of Comprehensive Income Data:
                                            
Net Income   $ 1,225     $ 743     $ 1,764     $ 1,128     $ 651  
Other comprehensive income (loss), net
of tax:
                                            
Post-employment benefits     33       63       (132 )      4       (50 ) 
Hedge instruments     16       (13 )      1       (17 )      35  
Translation adjustments and other     82       10       (127 )      (65 )      34  
Other comprehensive income (loss)     131       60       (258 )      (78 )      19  
Comprehensive income     1,356       803       1,506       1,050       670  
Less: Comprehensive income attributable to non-controlling interests     (1,011 )      (558 )      (947 )      (617 )      (278 ) 
Comprehensive income attributable to Icahn Enterprises   $ 345     $ 245     $ 559     $ 433     $ 392  
Comprehensive income attributable to Icahn Enterprises allocable to:
                                            
Limited partners   $ 318     $ 240     $ 548     $ 424     $ 374  
General partner     27       5       11       9       18  
Comprehensive income attributable to Icahn Enterprises   $ 345     $ 245     $ 559     $ 433     $ 392  

         
  Year Ended December 31,   Nine Months
Ended
September 30,
     2009   2010   2011   2011   2012
     (in millions, except per unit amounts) (unaudited)
Other Financial Data:
                                            
EBITDA attributable to Icahn Enterprises(1)   $ 798     $ 876     $ 1,463     $ 1,049     $ 975  
Adjusted EBITDA attributable to Icahn Enterprises(1)     907       939       1,547       1,070       1,218  
Cash distributions declared per depositary unit     1.00       1.00       0.55       0.45       0.30  

       
  As of
December 31,
  As of
September 30,
2012
     2009   2010   2011
     (in millions)   (unaudited)
Balance Sheet Data:
                                   
Cash and cash equivalents   $ 2,256     $ 2,963     $ 2,278     $ 3,140  
Investments     5,405       7,470       8,938       4,912  
Property, plant and equipment, net     2,958       3,455       3,505       6,325  
Total assets     18,886       21,338       25,136       24,332  
Debt     5,186       6,509       6,473       8,422  
Post-employment benefit liability     1,413       1,272       1,340       1,282  
Equity attributable to Icahn Enterprises     2,834       3,183       3,755       4,775  

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  Year Ended December 31,   Nine Months Ended September 30,   Pro Forma
     Year Ended December 31, 2011   Nine Months Ended September 30, 2011   Nine Months Ended September 30, 2012
     2009   2010   2011   2011   2012
                    (unaudited)
                    (in millions)
Segment Operating and Other Financial Data:
                                                                       
Consolidated revenues:
                                                                       
Investment   $ 1,502     $ 865     $ 1,882     $ 1,145     $ 304     $ 1,882     $ 1,145     $ 202  
Automotive     5,397       6,239       6,937       5,273       5,083       6,937       5,273       5,083  
Energy                             3,651       7,714       5,925       6,411  
Gaming(2)           78       624       477       488       624       477       488  
Railcar     444       270       514       319       488       514       319       488  
Food Packaging     296       317       338       255       253       338       255       253  
Metals     384       725       1,096       839       872       1,096       839       872  
Real Estate     96       90       90       70       69       90       70       69  
Home Fashion     382       431       325       263       176       325       263       176  
Holding Company     10       57       36       22       8       36       22       8  
     $ 8,511     $ 9,072     $ 11,842     $ 8,663     $ 11,392     $ 19,556     $ 14,588     $ 14,050  
Adjusted EBITDA before non-controlling interests(1):
                                                                       
Investment   $ 1,453     $ 823     $ 1,845     $ 1,123     $ 286     $ 1,845     $ 1,123     $ 184  
Automotive     489       661       688       530       418       688       530       418  
Energy                             771       991       805       1,081  
Gaming(2)           6       72       61       76       72       61       76  
Railcar     66       3       50       27       100       50       27       100  
Food Packaging     55       50       48       42       40       48       42       40  
Metals     (23 )      24       26       29       (11 )      26       29       (11 ) 
Real Estate     49       40       47       37       39       47       37       39  
Home Fashion     (20 )      (32 )      (31 )      (15 )      (2 )      (31 )      (15 )      (2 ) 
Holding Company     (12 )      69       5       8       (4 )      5       8       (4 ) 
     $ 2,057     $ 1,644     $ 2,750     $ 1,842     $ 1,713     $ 3,741     $ 2,647     $ 1,921  
Adjusted EBITDA attributable to Icahn Enterprises(1):
                                                                       
Investment   $ 469     $ 342     $ 876     $ 528     $ 122     $ 876     $ 528     $ 74  
Automotive     361       499       518       400       323       518       400       323  
Energy                             613       787       645       857  
Gaming(2)           1       37       33       50       37       33       50  
Railcar     36       2       27       13       58       27       13       58  
Food Packaging     40       37       35       31       30       35       31       30  
Metals     (23 )      24       26       29       (11 )      26       29       (11 ) 
Real Estate     49       40       47       37       39       47       37       39  
Home Fashion     (13 )      (23 )      (24 )      (9 )      (2 )      (24 )      (9 )      (2 ) 
Holding Company     (12 )      17       5       8       (4 )      5       8       (4 ) 
     $ 907     $ 939     $ 1,547     $ 1,070     $ 1,218     $ 2,334     $ 1,715     $ 1,414  

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(1) EBITDA represents earnings before interest expense, income tax (benefit) expense and depreciation and amortization. We define Adjusted EBITDA as EBITDA excluding the effects of impairment, restructuring costs, purchase accounting inventory adjustments, certain pension plan expenses, FIFO impacts, OPEB curtailment gains, certain share-based compensation, discontinued operations and losses on extinguishment of debt. We present EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA on a consolidated basis, net of the effect of non-controlling interests. We conduct substantially all of our operations through subsidiaries. The operating results of our subsidiaries may not be sufficient to make distributions to us. In addition, our subsidiaries are not obligated to make funds available to us for payment of our indebtedness, payment of distributions on our depositary units or otherwise, and distributions and intercompany transfers from our subsidiaries to us may be restricted by applicable law or covenants contained in debt agreements and other agreements to which these subsidiaries currently may be subject or into which they may enter into in the future. The terms of any borrowings of our subsidiaries or other entities in which we own equity may restrict dividends, distributions or loans to us.

We believe that providing EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA to investors has economic substance as these measures provide important supplemental information of our performance to investors and permits investors and management to evaluate the core operating performance of our business. Additionally, we believe this information is frequently used by securities analysts, investors and other interested parties in the evaluation of companies that have issued debt. Management uses, and believes that investors benefit from referring to these non-GAAP financial measures in assessing our operating results, as well as in planning, forecasting and analyzing future periods. Adjusting earnings for these charges allows investors to evaluate our performance from period to period, as well as our peers, without the effects of certain items that may vary depending on accounting methods and the book value of assets. Additionally, EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA present meaningful measures of corporate performance exclusive of our capital structure and the method by which assets were acquired and financed.

EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA have limitations as analytical tools, and you should not consider them in isolation, or as substitutes for analysis of our results as reported under generally accepted accounting principles in the United States, or U.S. GAAP. For example, EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA:

do not reflect our cash expenditures, or future requirements for capital expenditures, or contractual commitments;
do not reflect changes in, or cash requirements for, our working capital needs; and
do not reflect the significant interest expense, or the cash requirements necessary to service interest or principal payments on our debt.

Although depreciation and amortization are non-cash charges, the assets being depreciated or amortized often will have to be replaced in the future, and EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA do not reflect any cash requirements for such replacements. Other companies in the industries in which we operate may calculate EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA differently than we do, limiting their usefulness as comparative measures. In addition, EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA do not reflect the impact of earnings or charges resulting from matters we consider not to be indicative of our ongoing operations.

EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA are not measurements of our financial performance under U.S. GAAP and should not be considered as alternatives to net income or any other performance measures derived in accordance with U.S. GAAP or as alternatives to cash flow from operating activities as a measure of our liquidity. Given these limitations, we rely primarily on our U.S. GAAP results and use EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA only as a supplemental measure of our financial performance.

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The following table reconciles, on a basis attributable to Icahn Enterprises, net income attributable to Icahn Enterprises to EBITDA and EBITDA to Adjusted EBITDA for the periods indicated (in millions):

                 
  Year Ended December 31,   Nine Months Ended September 30,   Pro Forma     
     Year Ended
December 31,
2011
  Nine Months
Ended
September 30,
2011
  Nine Months
Ended
September 30,
2012
  Year Ended
December 31, 2012
Estimated
     2009   2010   2011   2011   2012
                    (unaudited)        (unaudited)     
Attributable to Icahn Enterprises:
                                                                                
Net income (loss)   $ 253     $ 199     $ 750     $ 490     $ 378     $ 1,126     $ 776     $ 353     $ 350  
Interest expense     268       338       377       283       340       429       322       358       462  
Income tax (benefit) expense     (40 )      11       27       45       (47 )      251       220       (32 )      (103 ) 
Depreciation, depletion and amortization     317       328       309       231       304       445       336       356       435  
EBITDA attributable to Icahn Enterprises   $ 798     $ 876     $ 1,463     $ 1,049     $ 975       2,251       1,654       1,035       1,144  
Impairment of assets(a)   $ 34     $ 8     $ 58     $ 2     $ 69     $ 58     $ 2     $ 69     $ 106  
Restructuring costs(b)     37       12       9       7       18       9       7       18       25  
Non-service cost of U.S. based pension(c)     35       25       18       14       22       18       14       22       27  
FIFO impact (favorable) unfavorable                             34       (37 )      2       39       48  
OPEB curtailment gains(d)           (22 )      (1 )            (40 )      (1 )            (40 )      (40 ) 
Certain share-based compensation expense(e)                             28       40       19       34       30  
Major scheduled turnaround expense(f)                                   54       10       28       87  
Expenses related to a certain proxy matter(g)                                               36        
Expenses related to certain acquisitions(h)                                   7             4       5  
Discontinued operations     (1 )                                                 
Net loss (gain) on extinguishment of debt(i)     4       40                   1       2       2       1       5  
Unrealized (gain)/loss on certain derivatives(j)                             96       (69 )      5       161       57  
Other                       (2 )      15       2             7       9  
Adjusted EBITDA attributable to Icahn Enterprises   $ 907     $ 939     $ 1,547     $ 1,070     $ 1,218       2,334       1,715       1,414       1,503  

(a) Represents asset impairment charges, net of non-controlling interests.
(b) Restructuring costs represent expenses incurred by our Automotive and Home Fashion segments, relating to efforts to integrate and rationalize businesses and to relocate manufacturing operations to best-cost countries, net of non-controlling interests.
(c) Represents expense associated with Federal-Mogul’s non-service cost of U.S. based funded pension plans, net of non-controlling interests.
(d) Represents curtailment gains relating to Federal-Mogul’s elimination of certain other postemployment benefits for certain of its employees, net of non-controlling interests.
(e) Represents certain share-based compensation expense, net of non-controlling interests.
(f) Represents major scheduled turnaround expenses associated with CVR's petroleum and fertilizer businesses, net of non-controlling interests.
(g) Represents expenses related to a certain proxy matter incurred by CVR, net of non-controlling interests
(h) Represents expenses related to certain acquisitions made by CVR, net of non-controlling interests.
(i) During the year ended December 31, 2010, we recognized a $40 million loss on the extinguishment of certain senior notes held by Icahn Enterprises, net of non-controlling interests.
(j) Represents unrealized gains on losses on certain derivatives, net of non-controlling interests.
(2) Gaming segment results for 2010 are for the periods commencing November 15, 2010.

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RISK FACTORS

An investment in our depositary units involves risks. You should carefully read the risk factors included in Item 1A. “Risk Factors” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2011, in our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q for the quarterly periods ended March 31, 2012, June 30, 2102, and September 30, 2012, the risk factors set forth in this prospectus supplement and the risk factors included in the accompanying prospectus beginning on page 3 therein, together with all of the other information included or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus. If any of these risks were to occur, our business, financial condition, results of operations or prospects could be materially adversely affected. In such case, the trading price of our depositary units could decline, and you could lose all or part of your investment.

The issuance of additional limited partner interests relating to this offering may make it more difficult to pay distributions.

Cash distributions are made out of our “available cash,” pro rata, to our unitholders. The increase in the number of our depositary units outstanding, as a result of the issuance of new depositary units representing limited partner interests relating to this offering may make it more difficult to pay such distributions. Also see “Risk Factors — Risks Relating to Our Structure — Future cash distributions to our unitholders, if any, can be affected by numerous factors” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2011.

If we issue additional depositary units representing limited partner interests or other equity securities as consideration for acquisitions or for other purposes, the relative voting strength of each holder of our depositary units will be diminished over time due to the dilution of the interests of each holder of our depositary units.

Our partnership agreement generally allows us to issue additional limited partner interests and other equity securities without the approval of holders of our depositary units. Therefore, when we issue additional depositary units or securities ranking on parity with our depositary units, the proportionate partner interest of each holder of our depositary units will decrease, and the amount of cash distributed on each depositary unit and the market price of our depositary units could decrease.

The depositary units being offered hereby (excluding any depositary units related to the underwriter’s option to purchase additional depositary units) constitute approximately    % of our outstanding depositary units immediately prior to this offering (based on 104,850,813 depositary units outstanding as of December 31, 2012). This offering will have the effects described in the paragraph above.

Management will have broad discretion as to the use of the net proceeds from this offering, and we may not use the proceeds effectively.

We intend to use the net proceeds from the offering and from the underwriter’s exercise of its option to purchase additional depositary units, if any, for general partnership purposes, which may include investments in our operating subsidiaries and potential acquisitions, in accordance with our investment strategy. Our management will have broad discretion in the application of such net proceeds from this offering. There is no guarantee that any such expenditures would result in improvement of our results of operations or enhancement of the value of our depositary units.

Our unitholders have been and will be required to pay taxes on their share of our taxable income even if they have not or do not receive any cash distributions from us.

Because our unitholders are treated as partners to whom we will allocate taxable income which could be different in amount than the cash we distribute, they will be required to pay any U.S. federal income taxes and, in some cases, state and local income taxes on their share of our taxable income, even if our unitholders receive no cash distributions from us. Thus, our unitholders may not receive cash distributions from us equal to their share of our taxable income or even equal to the actual tax liability that results from their share of our taxable income.

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The anticipated after-tax economic benefit of an investment in our depositary units depends on our status as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes, as well as our not being subject to a material amount of entity-level taxation by individual states. If the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) were to treat us as a corporation or if we were to become subject to a material amount of entity-level taxation for state tax purposes, then our cash available for distribution to our unitholders would be substantially reduced.

The anticipated after-tax economic benefit of an investment in our depositary units depends largely on us being treated as a partnership for federal income tax purposes. If less than 90% of the gross income of a publicly traded partnership, such as Icahn Enterprises, for any taxable year is “qualifying income” from sources such as interest (other than from a financial or insurance business), dividends, certain oil and gas revenues, real property rents, gains from the sale or other disposition of real property and gains from the sale or other disposition of capital assets held for the production of income that otherwise constitutes qualifying income, that partnership generally will be taxable as a corporation under Section 7704 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Internal Revenue Code”) for U.S. federal income tax purposes for that taxable year and all subsequent years. We believe that in all prior years of our existence at least 90% of our gross income was qualifying income and we intend to structure our business in a manner such that at least 90% of our gross income will constitute qualifying income this year and in the future. However, there can be no assurance that such structuring will be effective in all events to avoid the receipt of more than 10% of non-qualifying income. In addition, if we register under the Investment Company Act, we would be treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes. To meet the qualifying income test we may structure transactions in a manner which is less advantageous than if this were not a consideration, or we may avoid otherwise economically desirable transactions. We have not requested and do not plan to request a ruling from the IRS with respect to our treatment as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes.

If we were treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, then we would pay federal income tax on our income at the corporate tax rate, which is currently a maximum of 35%, and would likely pay additional state income tax at varying rates. Distributions would generally be taxed again to unitholders as corporate distributions and none of our income, gains, losses, deductions or credits would flow through to our unitholders for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Because a tax would be imposed upon us as a corporation, cash available for distribution to our unitholders would be substantially reduced. Treatment of us as a corporation would result in a material reduction in the anticipated cash flow and after-tax return to unitholders and thus would likely result in a substantial reduction in the value of our depositary units.

Current law may change so as to cause us to be treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes or otherwise subject us to entity-level taxation. In addition, because of widespread state budget deficits and other reasons, several states are evaluating ways to subject partnerships to entity-level taxation through the imposition of state income, franchise and other forms of taxation.

The tax treatment of publicly traded partnerships or an investment in our depositary units could be subject to potential legislative, judicial or administrative changes and differing interpretations, possibly on a retroactive basis.

The present U.S. federal income tax treatment of publicly traded partnerships, including Icahn Enterprises, or an investment in our depositary units may be modified by administrative, legislative or judicial interpretation at any time. Any modification to the federal income tax laws and interpretations thereof may or may not be applied retroactively. Moreover, any such modification could make it more difficult or impossible for us to meet the exception which allows publicly traded partnerships that generate qualifying income to be treated as partnerships (rather than corporations) for U.S. federal income tax purposes, affect or cause us to change our business activities, or affect the tax consequences of an investment in our depositary units. For example, legislation proposed by members of Congress and the President has considered substantive changes to the definition of qualifying income. We are unable to predict whether any of these changes, or other proposals, will ultimately be enacted. Any such changes could negatively impact the value of an investment in our depositary units.

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If the IRS contests any of the federal income tax positions we take, the market for our units may be adversely affected, and the costs of any contest will reduce our cash available for distribution to our unitholders.

We have not requested a ruling from the IRS with respect to our treatment as a partnership for federal income tax purposes or any other matter affecting us. The IRS may adopt positions that differ from the conclusions of our counsel. It may be necessary to resort to administrative or court proceedings to sustain some or all of our counsel’s conclusions or the positions we take. A court may not agree with some or all of our counsel’s conclusions or the positions we take. Any contest with the IRS may materially and adversely impact the market for our units and the price at which they trade. In addition, the costs of any contest with the IRS will be borne indirectly by our unitholders and our general partner because the costs will reduce our cash available for distribution.

Tax gain or loss on the disposition of our depositary units could be more or less than expected.

If our unitholders sell their depositary units, they will recognize a gain or loss for income tax purposes equal to the difference between the amount realized and their tax basis in those units. Prior distributions from us in excess of cumulative net taxable income for a depositary unit that decreased the unitholder’s tax basis in that depositary unit, will, in effect, become taxable income if the depositary unit is sold at a price greater than the selling unitholder’s tax basis in that depositary unit, even if the price received is less than such unitholder’s original cost. A portion of the amount realized, whether or not representing gain, may be ordinary income to the selling unitholder to the extent attributable to assets giving rise to depreciation recapture or other unrealized receivables (such as, for example, accrued but untaxed market discount on securities held by us) or to inventory items owned by us. In addition, because the amount realized includes a unitholder’s share of our nonrecourse liabilities, a unitholder who sells depositary units may incur a tax liability in excess of the amount of cash received from the sale.

Tax-exempt entities and non-United States persons face unique tax issues from owning units that may result in adverse tax consequences to them.

Investment in units by tax-exempt entities, such as individual retirement accounts (known as IRAs), pension plans, and non-U.S. persons raises issues unique to them. For example, some portion of our income allocated to organizations exempt from federal income tax will likely be unrelated business taxable income and will be taxable to them. Distributions to non-U.S. persons will be reduced by withholding taxes at the highest applicable effective tax rate, and non-U.S. persons will be required to file U.S. federal income tax returns and pay tax on their share of our taxable income. If a potential unitholder is a tax-exempt entity or a non-U.S. person, it should consult its tax advisor before investing in our units.

The sale or exchange of 50% or more of our capital and profits interests during any twelve-month period will result in the termination of our partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes.

We will be considered to have terminated for U.S. federal income tax purposes if there are one or more transfers of interests in our partnership that together represent a sale or exchange of 50% or more of the total interests in our capital and profits within a twelve-month period. For purposes of determining whether the 50% threshold has been met, multiple transfers of the same interests within a twelve month period will be counted only once.

Our termination would, among other things, result in the closing of our taxable year for all unitholders which would result in us filing two tax returns for one fiscal year and could result in a deferral of depreciation deductions allowable in computing our taxable income. In the case of a unitholder reporting on a taxable year other than a fiscal year ending December 31, the closing of our taxable year may also result in more than twelve months of our taxable income or loss being includable in such unitholder’s taxable income for the year of termination. Our termination currently would not affect our classification as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes, but instead, we would be treated as a new partnership for tax purposes. If treated as a new partnership, we must make new tax elections, and if we were to fail to recognize and report on our tax return that a termination occurred, we could be subject to penalties.

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Our unitholders likely will be subject to state and local taxes and return filing or withholding requirements in states in which they do not live as a result of investing in our units.

In addition to U.S. federal income taxes, our unitholders will likely be subject to other taxes, such as state and local income taxes, unincorporated business taxes and estate, inheritance, or intangible taxes that are imposed by the various jurisdictions in which we do business or own property. Our unitholders may be required to file state and local income tax returns and pay state and local income taxes in certain of these various jurisdictions. Further, our unitholders may be subject to penalties for failure to comply with those requirements. We own property and conduct business in Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Wisconsin.] It is each unitholder’s responsibility to file all U.S. federal, state and local tax returns. Our counsel has not rendered an opinion on the state and local tax consequences of an investment in our units.

We prorate our items of income, gain, loss and deduction between transferors and transferees of our units based upon the ownership of our units at the close of business on the last day of each month, instead of on the basis of the date a particular unit is transferred. The IRS may challenge this treatment, which could change the allocation of items of income, gain, loss and deduction among our unitholders.

We prorate our items of income, gain, loss and deduction between transferors and transferees of our units based upon the ownership of our units at the close of business on the last day of each month, instead of on the basis of the date a particular unit is transferred. The U.S. Treasury Department issued proposed Treasury regulations that provide a safe harbor pursuant to which publicly traded partnerships may use a similar monthly simplifying convention to allocate tax items among transferor and transferee unitholders. Nonetheless, the proposed regulations do not specifically authorize the use of the proration method we have adopted. If the IRS were to challenge this method or new Treasury regulations were issued, we may be required to change the allocation of items of income, gain, loss and deduction among our unitholders.

A unitholder whose units are loaned to a “short seller” to cover a short sale of units may be considered as having disposed of those units. If so, such unitholder would no longer be treated for tax purposes as a partner with respect to those units during the period of the loan and may recognize gain or loss from the disposition.

Because a unitholder whose units are loaned to a “short seller” to cover a short sale of units may be considered as having disposed of the loaned units, such unitholder may no longer be treated for tax purposes as a partner with respect to those units during the period of the loan to the short seller and the unitholder may recognize gain or loss from such disposition. Moreover, during the period of the loan to the short seller, any of our income, gain, loss or deduction with respect to those units may not be reportable by the unitholder and any cash distributions received by the unitholder as to those units could be fully taxable as ordinary income. Our counsel has not rendered an opinion regarding the treatment of a unitholder where units are loaned to a short seller to cover a short sale of units; therefore, unitholders desiring to assure their status as partners and avoid the risk of gain recognition from a loan to a short seller are urged to modify any applicable brokerage account agreements to prohibit their brokers from borrowing their units.

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USE OF PROCEEDS

We estimate that the net proceeds to us from this offering, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses, will be approximately $      million (or approximately $      million if the underwriter exercises its option to purchase additional depositary units in full).

We intend to use the net proceeds from the offering and from the underwriter’s exercise of its option to purchase additional depositary units, if any, for general partnership purposes, which may include investments in our operating subsidiaries and potential acquisitions, in accordance with our investment strategy.

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CAPITALIZATION

The following table sets forth our cash and cash equivalents and our capitalization as of September 30, 2012:

on an actual basis;
on an adjusted basis to give effect to the consummation of this offering.

You should read our financial statements and notes that are incorporated by reference into the accompanying prospectus for additional information regarding us.

   
  As of September 30, 2012
     Actual   As Adjusted
     (in millions)   (unaudited)
Cash and cash equivalents   $ 3,140     $          
Total debt     8,422           
Equity:
                 
Limited partners     5,016           
General partner     (241 )          
Equity attributable to Icahn Enterprises     4,775  
Equity attributable to non-controlling interests     5,023           
Total partners’ capital     9,798           
Total capitalization   $ 18,220     $  

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PRICE RANGE OF DEPOSITARY UNITS AND DISTRIBUTIONS

Our depositary units are traded on The NASDAQ Global Select Market (“NASDAQ”) under the symbol “IEP.” The range of high and low sales prices for the depositary units on the NASDAQ Composite Tape for each quarter during 2011, 2012 and the first quarter of 2013 through February 28, 2013 are as follows:

   
  Price Ranges
     High   Low
Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2011
                 
First Quarter   $ 42.51     $ 34.92  
Second Quarter     46.45       38.02  
Third Quarter     46.39       35.99  
Fourth Quarter     43.93       35.60  
Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2012
                 
First Quarter   $ 42.53     $ 35.83  
Second Quarter     48.64       39.22  
Third Quarter     41.85       37.61  
Fourth Quarter     44.70       37.86  
Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2013
                 
First Quarter (through February 28, 2013)   $ 87.99     $ 45.75  

As of December 31, 2012, there were 11,437 record holders of our depositary units.

Distributions

During fiscal year 2012, we paid four quarterly cash distributions comprising of $0.10 per depositary unit.

On February 10, 2013, the board of directors of Icahn Enterprises GP declared a quarterly distribution of $1.00 per depositary unit, payable in cash or additional depositary units. The distribution will be paid on or about April 15, 2013 to depositary unitholders of record at the close of business on February 21, 2013. The cut-off date for brokers or nominees to advise our transfer agent, Registrar and Transfer Company, of their payment election is March 14, 2013. We will calculate the depositary units to be distributed to depositary unitholders based on the 20 trading day volume weighted average price of our depositary units immediately following the cut-off date. To the extent that the aggregate units to be distributed to any holder would include a fraction of a unit, that fractional unit will be settled in cash.

The declaration and payment of distributions is reviewed quarterly by Icahn Enterprises GP’s board of directors based upon a review of our balance sheet and cash flow, the ratio of current assets to current liabilities, our expected capital and liquidity requirements, the provisions of our partnership agreement and provisions in our financing arrangements governing distributions, and keeping in mind that limited partners subject to U.S. federal income tax have recognized income on our earnings even if they do not receive distributions that could be used to satisfy any resulting tax obligations. The payment of future distributions will be determined by the board of directors quarterly, based upon the factors described above and other factors that it deems relevant at the time that declaration of a distribution is considered. Payments of distributions are subject to certain restrictions. There can be no assurance as to whether or in what amounts any future distributions might be paid.

As of December 31, 2012, there were 104,850,813 depositary units outstanding. Each depositary unitholder will be taxed on the unitholder’s allocable share of our taxable income and gains.

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MATERIAL U.S. FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSIDERATIONS

This section is a summary of the material U.S. federal income tax considerations that may be relevant to prospective holders of our depositary units. The following portion of this section and the opinion of Proskauer Rose LLP, our tax counsel, that is set out herein are based upon the Internal Revenue Code, regulations thereunder and current administrative rulings and court decisions, all of which are subject to change possibly with retroactive effect. Subsequent changes in such authorities may cause the tax consequences to vary substantially from the consequences described below.

No attempt has been made in the following discussion to comment on all U.S. federal income tax matters affecting us or the holders of our depositary units. Moreover, the discussion focuses on holders of our depositary units who are individuals and who are citizens or residents of the United States and has only limited application to corporations, estates, trusts, non-resident aliens or other holders of our depositary units subject to specialized tax treatment, such as tax-exempt institutions, foreign persons, U.S. expatriates, individual retirement accounts, REITs (real estate investment trusts), RICs (regulated investment companies) or persons holding our depositary units as part of a hedge, straddle or other risk reduction or constructive sale transaction. The discussion also applies only to holders that hold our depositary units as “capital assets” (generally, for investment) as defined in the Internal Revenue Code. Accordingly, each prospective holder of our depositary units should consult, and should depend on, its own tax advisor in analyzing the U.S. federal, state, local and foreign tax and other tax consequences of the purchase, ownership or disposition of depositary units.

All statements as to matters of law and legal conclusions, but not as to factual matters, contained in this section, unless otherwise noted, are the opinion of Proskauer Rose LLP and are based on the accuracy of the representations made by us.

For reasons described below, Proskauer Rose LLP has not rendered an opinion with respect to the following specific U.S. federal income tax issues: (1) the treatment of a holder of our depositary units whose depositary units are loaned to a short seller to cover a short sale of depositary units (please read “— Tax Treatment of Holders of Our Depositary Units — Treatment of Short Sales”); (2) whether our monthly convention for allocating taxable income and losses is permitted by existing Treasury Regulations (please read “— Disposition of Depositary Units — Allocations Between Transferors and Transferees”); and (3) whether our method for depreciating Section 743 adjustments is sustainable in certain cases (please read “— Tax Treatment of Holders of Our Depositary Units — Section 754 Election”).

Partnership Status

An entity that is treated as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes is not a taxable entity and incurs no U.S. federal income tax liability. Instead, each partner is required to take into account its share of the items of income, gain, loss and deduction of the partnership in computing its U.S. federal income tax liability, regardless of whether distributions are made to such partner by the partnership. Distributions of cash by a partnership to a partner are generally not taxable unless the amount of cash distributed to a partner is in excess of the partner’s tax basis in its partner interest.

Section 7704 of the Internal Revenue Code provides that publicly traded partnerships will, as a general rule, be taxed as corporations. However, an exception exists with respect to publicly traded partnerships of which 90% or more of the gross income for every taxable year consists of “qualifying income,” as described in clause (d) below. Qualifying income includes interest (other than from a financial or insurance business), dividends, certain oil and gas revenues, real property rents, gains from the sale or other disposition of real property, and gains from the sale or other disposition of capital assets held for the production of income that otherwise constitutes qualifying income. Based upon and subject to estimates and factual representations made by us and our general partner and a review of the applicable legal authorities, Proskauer Rose LLP is of the opinion that at least 90% of our current gross income constitutes qualifying income. The portion of our income that is qualifying income may change from time to time. If we fail to meet this qualifying income exception in any taxable year, other than a failure that is determined by the IRS to be inadvertent and which is cured within a reasonable time after discovery (in which case, the IRS may also require us to make adjustments with respect to our holders of our depositary units or pay other amounts), we will be treated as if we transferred all of our

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assets (subject to liabilities) to a newly formed corporation, on the first day of such taxable year in return for stock in that corporation, and as though we then distributed that stock to our partners in liquidation of their interests in us. This contribution and liquidation should be tax-free to our partners and to us, so long as we do not have liabilities at that time in excess of the tax basis of our assets. Thereafter, we would be treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes.

No ruling has been or will be sought from the IRS, and the IRS has made no determination as to our status for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Instead, we rely on the opinion of Proskauer Rose LLP on such matters. It is the opinion of Proskauer Rose LLP that, based upon the Code, its regulations and published revenue rulings, the court decisions and certain assumptions and representations made by us, that, as of the date hereof, each of Icahn Enterprises and the Operating Partnership will be classified as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes, provided that:

(a) neither we nor the Operating Partnership has elected or will elect to be treated as a corporation;
(b) we and the Operating Partnership have been and will be operated in accordance with (i) all applicable partnership statutes and (ii) the Partnership Agreement or the Operating Partnership Agreement (whichever is applicable);
(c) we have not at any time engaged in the business of writing insurance or annuity contracts or the reinsuring of risks underwritten by insurance companies, nor have we conducted any banking activities; and
(d) for each of our taxable years from and after our formation, more than 90% of our gross income has been and will be income of a character that Proskauer Rose LLP has opined or will opine is “qualifying income” within the meaning of Section 7704(d) of the Internal Revenue Code.

Icahn Enterprises believes that such assumptions have been true in the past and expects that such assumptions will be true in the future.

An opinion of counsel represents only that particular counsel’s best legal judgment, is based upon certain assumptions and representations made by us and does not bind the IRS or the courts. No assurance can be provided that the opinions and statements set forth herein would be sustained by a court if contested by the IRS. Any such contest with the IRS may materially and adversely impact the market for the depositary units and the prices at which depositary units trade even if we prevail. In addition, our costs of any contest with the IRS will be borne indirectly by our holders of our depositary units and our general partner because the costs will reduce our cash available for distribution.

If we or the Operating Partnership were treated as a corporation in any taxable year, either as a result of a failure to meet the qualifying income exception or otherwise, our items of income, gain, loss and deduction would be reflected only on our tax return rather than being passed through to holders of our depositary units, and our net income would be taxed at corporate rates. In addition, if we were treated as a corporation, any distribution we made to a holder of our depositary units would be treated as taxable dividend income to the extent of our current or accumulated earnings and profits, and then, in the absence of earnings and profits, such distributions would be treated as a nontaxable return of capital, to the extent of the tax basis of the holder of depositary units in such holder’s depositary units, and would be treated as taxable capital gain after the tax basis of the holder of depositary units in the depositary units is reduced to zero. Accordingly, treatment of either us or the Operating Partnership as a corporation would result in a material reduction in the cash flow and after-tax return of a holder of our depositary units and thus would likely result in a substantial reduction of the value of the depositary units.

The discussion below is based on our counsel’s opinion that Icahn Enterprises will be classified as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes.

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Tax Treatment of Holders of Our Depositary Units

Partner Status

Holders of our depositary units who have become our limited partners will be treated as our partners for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Also, holders of our depositary units whose depositary units are held in street name or by a nominee and who have the right to direct the nominee in the exercise of the rights attendant to the ownership of their depositary units will be treated as our partners for U.S. federal income tax purposes.

An owner of depositary units whose depositary units have been transferred to a short seller to complete a short sale would appear to lose its status as a partner with respect to such depositary units for U.S. federal income tax purposes and may recognize gain or loss on such transfer. Please read “— Treatment of Short Sales” below.

No part of our income, gain, deductions or losses is reportable by a holder of our depositary units who is not a partner for U.S. federal income tax purposes, and any distributions received by such a holder of our depositary units should therefore be fully taxable as ordinary income. These holders are urged to consult their own tax advisors with respect to their tax consequences of holding our depositary units.

In the following portion of this section titled “Tax Treatment of Holders of Our Depositary Units,” the word “unitholder” refers to a holder of our depositary units who is one of our partners.

Flow-Through of Taxable Income

Subject to the discussion below under “— Entity-Level Collections,” we will not pay any U.S. federal income tax. Instead, each unitholder will be required to report on its income tax return its share of our income, gains, losses and deductions without regard to whether we make cash distributions to such unitholder. Consequently, we may allocate income to a unitholder even if it has not received a cash distribution. Each unitholder will be required to include in income its allocable share of our income, gains, losses and deductions for our taxable year ending with or within its taxable year.

Treatment of Distributions by Icahn Enterprises

Our distributions to a unitholder generally will not be taxable to it for U.S. federal income tax purposes to the extent of the tax basis it has in its depositary units immediately before the distribution. Our distributions in excess of a unitholder’s tax basis generally will be gain from the sale or exchange of the depositary units, taxable in accordance with the rules described under “Disposition of Depositary Units — Recognition of Gain or Loss” below. Any reduction in a unitholder’s share of our liabilities for which no partner, including the general partner, bears the economic risk of loss (“nonrecourse liabilities”) will be treated as a distribution of cash to that unitholder. To the extent our distributions cause a unitholder’s “at-risk” amount to be less than zero at the end of any taxable year, such unitholder must recapture any losses deducted in previous years. Please read “— Limitations on Deductibility of Icahn Enterprises’ Losses” below.

A decrease in a unitholder’s percentage interest in us because of our issuance of additional depositary units (including as a result of any election by other unitholders to receive distributions from us in the form of additional depositary units rather than cash) will decrease such unitholder’s share of nonrecourse liabilities, if any, and thus will result in a corresponding deemed distribution of cash to such unitholder. This deemed distribution may constitute a non-pro rata distribution. A non-pro rata distribution of money or property may result in ordinary income to a unitholder if such distribution reduces the unitholder’s share of our “unrealized receivables,” including depreciation recapture or substantially appreciated “inventory items,” both as defined in Section 751 of the Internal Revenue Code (collectively, “Section 751 assets”). In that event, the unitholder will be treated as having received as a distribution the portion of the Section 751 assets that used to be allocated to such partner and as having exchanged such portion of our assets with us in return for the non-pro rata portion of the actual distribution made to it. This latter deemed exchange will generally result in the unitholder’s realization of ordinary income in an amount equal to the excess of (1) the non-pro rata portion of such distribution over (2) the unitholder’s tax basis for the share of such Section 751 assets deemed relinquished in the exchange.

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Basis of Depositary Units

A unitholder’s initial tax basis in its depositary units will be the amount paid for the units increased by the unitholder’s share of our nonrecourse liabilities. That basis will be increased by its share of our income and by any increase in its share of our nonrecourse liabilities. That basis will be decreased, but not below zero, by its share of our distributions, by its share of our losses, by any decrease in its share of our nonrecourse liabilities and by its share of our expenditures that are not deductible in computing our taxable income and are not required to be capitalized.

Although the tax treatment of a unitholder’s election to receive a distribution in the form of additional depositary units is not completely clear, we intend to treat such unitholder as having received the applicable distribution in cash and immediately contributing such amount to us in exchange for additional depositary units. The deemed distribution and corresponding investment will not, in and of themselves, have any net effect on the basis of such unitholder’s depositary units. This is the case even though such unitholder’s basis would be reduced by the amount of the distribution, because such unitholder’s basis would be increased by an equal amount as a result of the corresponding reinvestment. Such unitholder’s share of our nonrecourse liabilities — which are also included in such unitholder’s basis — could increase relative to those unitholders who do not elect to receive such distribution in the form of additional depositary units, however, because such unitholder’s relative ownership interest in us would be deemed to have increased. The unitholder may elect to use the actual holding period in the additional depositary units, which will begin on the date of distribution of such depositary units. Please see “Disposition of Depositary Units — Recognition of Gain or Loss” for more information.

Limitations on Deductibility of Icahn Enterprises’ Losses

The deduction by a unitholder of that unitholder’s share of our losses will be limited to the amount of that unitholder’s tax basis in the depositary units and, in the case of an individual unitholder, estate, trust or certain closely-held corporate unitholders (i.e., if more than 50% of the value of the corporate unitholder’s stock is owned directly or indirectly by five or fewer individuals or some tax-exempt organizations) to the amount for which the unitholder is considered to be “at risk” with respect to our activities, if that amount is less than the unitholder’s tax basis. A unitholder subject to these limitations must recapture losses deducted in previous years to the extent that our distributions cause the unitholder’s at-risk amount to be less than zero at the end of any taxable year. Losses disallowed to a unitholder or recaptured as a result of these limitations will carry forward and will be allowable to the extent that the unitholder’s at-risk amount is subsequently increased, provided such losses do not exceed such unitholder’s tax basis in its units. Upon the taxable disposition of a unit, any gain recognized by a unitholder can be offset by losses that were previously suspended by the at-risk limitation but may not be offset by losses suspended by the basis limitation. Any loss previously suspended by the at-risk limitation in excess of that gain would no longer be utilizable.

In general, a unitholder will be at risk to the extent of the unitholder’s tax basis in the unitholder’s depositary units, excluding any portion of that basis attributable to the unitholder’s share of our nonrecourse liabilities, reduced by (i) any portion of that basis representing amounts otherwise protected against loss because of a guarantee, stop loss agreement or other similar arrangement and (ii) any amount of money the unitholder borrows to acquire or hold the unitholder’s depositary units if the lender of such borrowed funds owns an interest in us, is related to such a person or can look only to depositary units for repayment. A unitholder’s at-risk amount will increase or decrease as the tax basis of the unitholder’s depositary units increases or decreases, other than tax basis increases or decreases attributable to increases or decreases in the unitholder’s share of our nonrecourse liabilities.

In addition to the basis and at-risk limitations on the deductibility of losses, the passive loss limitations generally provide that individuals, estates, trusts, certain closely-held corporations and personal service corporations can deduct losses from passive activities, which include any trade or business activity in which the taxpayer does not materially participate, only to the extent of the taxpayer’s income from those passive activities. Moreover, the passive loss limitations are applied separately with respect to each publicly traded partnership. Consequently, any passive losses generated by us will only be available to our partners who are subject to the passive loss rules to offset future passive income generated by us and, in particular, will not be

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available to offset income from other passive activities, investments or salary. Passive losses that are not deductible because they exceed a unitholder’s share of our income may be deducted in full when the unitholder disposes of the unitholder’s entire investment in us in a fully taxable transaction to an unrelated party, such as a sale by the unitholder of all of its units in the open market. The passive activity loss rules are applied after other applicable limitations on deductions such as the at-risk rules and the basis limitation.

Limitations on Interest Deductions

The deductibility of a non-corporate taxpayer’s “investment interest expense” is generally limited to the amount of such taxpayer’s “net investment income.” Investment interest expense includes (i) interest on indebtedness properly allocable to property held for investment, (ii) our interest expense attributed to portfolio income, and (iii) the portion of interest expense incurred to purchase or carry an interest in a passive activity to the extent attributable to portfolio income. The computation of a unitholder’s investment interest expense will take into account interest on any margin account borrowing or other loan incurred to purchase or carry a depositary unit.

Net investment income includes gross income from property held for investment and amounts treated as portfolio income pursuant to the passive loss rules less deductible expenses, other than interest, directly connected with the production of investment income, but generally does not include capital gains or qualified dividend income. The IRS has indicated that any net passive income earned by a publicly traded partnership will be treated as investment income to its unitholders for purposes of the investment interest deduction limitation. In addition, a unitholder’s share of our portfolio income will be treated as investment income.

Entity-Level Collections

If we are required or elect under applicable law to pay any U.S. federal, state or local income tax on behalf of any partner, we are authorized to pay those taxes from our funds. Such payment, if made, will be treated as a distribution of cash to the partner on whose behalf the payment was made. Any payment that we make as described above could give rise to an overpayment of tax on behalf of an individual unitholder, in which event the unitholder could be required to file a tax return or a claim for refund in order to obtain a credit or refund of that tax.

Allocation of Partnership Income, Gain, Loss and Deduction

For U.S. federal income tax purposes, a unitholder’s allocable share of our items of income, gain, loss, deduction or credit will be governed by the Partnership Agreement if such allocations have “substantial economic effect” or are determined to be in accordance with a unitholder’s partner interest. Our items of income, gain, loss and deduction generally are allocated among the general partner and the unitholders in accordance with their respective percentage interests in us, subject to Section 704(c) of the Internal Revenue Code. We believe that for U.S. federal income tax purposes, subject to the issues described below in “— Section 754 Election” and “— Disposition of Depositary Units — Allocations Between Transferors and Transferees,” such allocations will have substantial economic effect or be in accordance with your partner interest. If the IRS successfully challenges the allocations made pursuant to the limited partnership agreement, the resulting allocations for U.S. federal income tax purposes might be less favorable than the allocations set forth in the limited partnership agreement.

Certain items of our income, gain, loss or deduction will be allocated as required or permitted by Section 704(c) of the Internal Revenue Code to account for any difference between the tax basis and fair market value of property heretofore contributed to us. Allocations may also be made to account for the difference between the fair market value of our assets and their tax basis at the time of any offering made pursuant to this prospectus supplement.

In addition, certain items of recapture income which we recognize on the sale of any of our assets will be allocated to the extent provided in regulations which generally require such depreciation recapture to be allocated to the partner who (or whose predecessor in interest) was allocated the deduction giving rise to the treatment of such gain as recapture income.

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Treatment of Short Sales

A unitholder whose units are loaned to a “short seller” to cover a short sale of units may be considered as having disposed of those units. If so, such unitholder would no longer be treated for tax purposes as a partner with respect to those units during the period of the loan and may recognize gain or loss from the disposition. As a result, during this period:

any of our income, gain, loss or deduction with respect to those units would not be reportable by the unitholder;
any cash distributions received by the unitholder as to those units would be fully taxable; and
all of these distributions would appear to be ordinary income.

Proskauer Rose LLP has not rendered an opinion regarding the tax treatment of a unitholder whose units are loaned to a short seller to cover a short sale of units; therefore, unitholders desiring to assure their status as partners and avoid the risk of gain recognition from a loan to a short seller are urged to modify any applicable brokerage account agreements to prohibit their brokers from borrowing and loaning their units. Please also read “— Disposition of Depositary Units — Recognition of Gain or Loss.”

Alternative Minimum Tax

Each unitholder will be required to take into account its share of our items of income, gain, loss or deduction for purposes of the alternative minimum tax. The current minimum tax rate for noncorporate taxpayers is 26% on the first $175,000 of alternative minimum taxable income in excess of the exemption amount and 28% on any additional alternative minimum taxable income. Prospective unitholders are urged to consult their own tax advisors as to the impact of an investment in depositary units on their liability for the alternative minimum tax.

Tax Rates

Under current law, the highest marginal U.S. federal income tax rate applicable to ordinary income of individuals is 39.6% and the highest marginal U.S. federal income tax rate applicable to long-term capital gains (generally, gains from the sale or exchange of certain investment assets held for more than 12 months) of individuals is 20%. These rates are subject to change by new legislation at any time.

Certain net investment income earned by U.S. citizens and resident aliens and certain estates and trusts for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2012 is also subject to a 3.8% Medicare tax. For these purposes, net investment income generally includes a unitholder’s allocable share of our income and gain realized by a unitholder from a sale of units. In the case of an individual, the tax will be imposed on the lesser of (i) the unitholder’s net investment income or (ii) the amount by which the unitholder’s modified adjusted gross income exceeds $250,000 (if the unitholder is married and filing jointly or a surviving spouse), $125,000 (if the unitholder is married and filing separately) or $200,000 (in any other case). In the case of an estate or trust, the tax will be imposed on the lesser of (i) undistributed net investment income, or (ii) the excess adjusted gross income over the dollar amount at which the highest income tax bracket applicable to an estate or trust begins.

Section 754 Election

We have made the election permitted by Section 754 of the Internal Revenue Code, which permits us to adjust the tax basis of our assets as to each purchaser of our depositary units pursuant to Section 743(b) of the Internal Revenue Code to reflect the purchaser’s purchase price. The Section 743(b) adjustment is intended to provide a purchaser with the equivalent of an adjusted tax basis in the purchaser’s share of our assets equal to the value of such share that is indicated by the amount that the purchaser paid for the depositary units.

A Section 754 election is advantageous if the transferee’s tax basis in the transferee’s depositary units is higher than such depositary units’ share of the aggregate tax basis of our assets immediately prior to the transfer because the transferee would have, as a result of the election, a higher tax basis in the transferee’s share of our assets. Conversely, a Section 754 election is disadvantageous if the transferee’s tax basis in the transferee’s depositary units is lower than such depositary units’ share of the aggregate tax basis of our assets

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immediately prior to the transfer. Thus, the fair market value of the depositary units may be affected either favorably or unfavorably by the election. A basis adjustment is required regardless of whether a Section 754 election is made in the case of a transfer of an interest in us if we have a substantial built-in loss immediately after the transfer, or if we distribute property and have a substantial basis reduction. The Section 754 election is irrevocable without the consent of the IRS.

The calculations involved in the Section 754 election are complex and are made by us on the basis of certain assumptions as to the value of our assets and other matters. There is no assurance that the determinations made by us will prevail if challenged by the IRS and that the deductions resulting from them will not be reduced or disallowed altogether. Moreover, we intend to depreciate the portion of a Section 743(b) adjustment attributable to unrealized appreciation in the value of any property contributed to us consistent with the methods employed by other publicly traded partnerships and the Treasury regulations under Section 743, but this method is arguably inconsistent with Treasury Regulation 1.167(c)-1(a)(6), which is not expected to directly apply to a material portion of our assets. Due to these simplifying assumptions and the particular methods we have chosen, the IRS could seek to reallocate some or all of any Section 743(b) adjustments we make to the basis of certain assets. Should the IRS require a different basis adjustment to be made, and should, in our opinion, the expense of compliance exceed the benefit of the election, we may seek permission from the IRS to revoke our Section 754 election. If permission is granted, a subsequent purchaser of units may be allocated more income than he would have been allocated had the election not been revoked.

Tax Treatment of Operations

Accounting Method and Taxable Year

We use the year ending December 31 as our taxable year and the accrual method of accounting for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Each unitholder will be required to include in income its share of our income, gain, loss and deduction for our taxable year ending within or with its taxable year. In addition, a unitholder who has a taxable year ending on a date other than December 31 and who disposes of all of its units following the close of our taxable year but before the close of its taxable year must include its share of our income, gain, loss, and deduction in income for its taxable year, with the result that such unitholder will be required to include in its taxable income for its taxable year its share of more than twelve months of our income, gain, loss, and deduction. Please read “— Disposition of Depositary Units — Allocations Between Transferors and Transferees.”

Initial Tax Basis, Depreciation, Amortization and Certain Nondeductible Items

We use the adjusted tax basis of our various assets for purposes of computing depreciation and cost recovery deductions and gain or loss on any disposition of such assets. If we dispose of depreciable property, all or a portion of any gain may be subject to the recapture rules and taxed as ordinary income rather than capital gain. The U.S. federal income tax burden associated with the difference between the fair market value of our assets and their tax basis immediately prior to an offering (such as this units offering) will be borne by our partners holding interests in us prior to such offering. Please read “— Tax Treatment of Holders of our Depositary Units — Allocations of Partnership Income, Gain, Loss and Deduction.”

To the extent allowable, we may elect to use the depreciation and cost recovery methods that will result in the largest deductions being taken in the early years after assets subject to these allowances are placed in service. Property we subsequently acquire or construct may be depreciated using accelerated methods permitted by the Internal Revenue Code.

The costs incurred in promoting the issuance of depositary units (i.e., syndication expenses) must be capitalized and cannot be deducted by us currently, ratably or upon our termination. Uncertainties exist regarding the classification of costs as organization expenses, which may be amortized, and as syndication expenses, which may not be amortized, but underwriters’ discounts and commissions are treated as syndication costs.

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Valuation of Icahn Enterprises’ Property and Basis of Properties

The U.S. federal income tax consequences of the ownership and disposition of depositary units will depend in part on our estimates of the fair market values and our determinations of the adjusted tax basis of our assets. Although we may from time to time consult with professional appraisers with respect to valuation matters, we will make many of the fair market value estimates ourselves. These estimates and determinations are subject to challenge and will not be binding on the IRS or the courts. If such estimates or determinations of basis are subsequently found to be incorrect, the character and amount of items of income, gain, loss or deductions previously reported by holders of our depositary units might change, and holders of our depositary units might be required to adjust their tax liability for prior years.

Disposition of Depositary Units

Recognition of Gain or Loss

A unitholder will recognize gain or loss on a sale of depositary units equal to the difference between the amount realized and the unitholder’s tax basis in the depositary units sold. A unitholder’s amount realized is measured by the sum of the cash and the fair market value of other property received plus the unitholder’s share of our nonrecourse liabilities. Because the amount realized includes a unitholder’s share of our nonrecourse liabilities, the gain recognized on the sale of depositary units could result in a tax liability in excess of any cash received from such sale.

Prior distributions from us in excess of cumulative net taxable income for a depositary unit that decreased a unitholder’s tax basis in that depositary unit will, in effect, become taxable income if the depositary unit is sold at a price greater than the unitholder’s tax basis in that depositary unit, even if the price received is less than such unitholder’s original cost.

Gain or loss recognized by a unitholder, other than a “dealer” in depositary units, on the sale or exchange of a depositary unit will generally be a capital gain or loss. Capital gain recognized on the sale of depositary units held for more than one year will generally be taxed at a maximum rate of 20%. In addition, all or a portion of the gain realized by a unitholder on the sale or exchange of a unit, regardless of whether the unit was held for more than twelve months, will generally be subject to a 3.8% Medicare tax. Please read “— Tax Treatment of Holders of our Depositary Units — Tax Rates.” A portion of this gain or loss (which could be substantial), however, will be separately computed and will be classified as ordinary income or loss under Section 751 of the Internal Revenue Code to the extent attributable to assets giving rise to depreciation recapture or other unrealized receivables or to inventory items owned by us. Ordinary income attributable to unrealized receivables, inventory items and depreciation recapture may exceed net taxable gain realized upon the sale of the depositary units and will be recognized even if there is a net taxable loss realized on the sale of the depositary units. Thus, a unitholder may recognize both ordinary income and a capital loss upon a disposition of depositary units. Net capital loss may offset no more than $3,000 ($1,500 in the case of a married individual filing a separate return) of ordinary income in the case of individuals and may only be used to offset capital gain in the case of corporations.

The IRS has ruled that a partner who acquires interests in a partnership in separate transactions must combine those interests and maintain a single adjusted tax basis. Upon a sale or other disposition of less than all of such interests, a portion of that tax basis must be allocated to the interests sold based upon relative fair market values. If this ruling is applicable to the holders of depositary units, a unitholder will be unable to select high or low basis depositary units to sell as would be the case with corporate stock. Thus, the ruling may result in an acceleration of gain or a deferral of loss on a sale of a portion of a unitholder’s depositary units. It is not entirely clear that the ruling applies to us because, similar to corporate stock, our interests are evidenced by separate certificates. Accordingly, counsel is unable to opine as to the effect such ruling will have on the holders of our depositary units. On the other hand, a selling unitholder who can identify depositary units transferred with an ascertainable holding period may elect to use the actual holding period of the depositary units transferred. A unitholder electing to use the actual holding period of depositary units transferred must consistently use that identification method for all later sales or exchanges of depositary units.

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Specific provisions of the Code affect the taxation of some financial products and securities, including partner interests, by treating a taxpayer as having sold an “appreciated” partner interest, one in which gain would be recognized if it were sold, assigned or terminated at its fair market value, if the taxpayer or related persons enter(s) into:

a short sale;
an offsetting notional principal contract; or
a futures or forward contract with respect to the partner interest or substantially identical property.

Moreover, if a taxpayer has previously entered into a short sale, an offsetting notional principal contract, or a futures or forward contract with respect to the partner interest, the taxpayer will be treated as having sold that position if the taxpayer or a related person then acquires the partner interest or substantially identical property. The Secretary of the Treasury is also authorized to issue regulations that treat a taxpayer that enters into transactions or positions that have substantially the same effect as the preceding transactions as having constructively sold the financial position.

Allocations between Transferors and Transferees

In general, we prorate our items of income, gain, loss and deduction between transferors and transferees of our depositary units based upon the ownership of our depositary units at the close of business on the last day of each month, instead of on the basis of the date a particular unit is transferred. As a result, a unitholder transferring depositary units in the open market may not be allocated income, gain, loss and deduction even if it was accrued prior to the date of transfer.

The Department of the Treasury has issued proposed Treasury Regulations that provide a safe harbor pursuant to which a publicly traded partnership may use a similar monthly simplifying convention to allocate tax items among transferor and transferee holders of its depositary units, although such tax items must be prorated on a daily basis. Existing publicly traded partnerships are entitled to rely on these proposed Treasury Regulations; however, they are subject to change until final Treasury Regulations are issued. Accordingly, Proskauer Rose LLP is unable to opine on the validity of this method of allocating income and deductions between transferor and transferee holders of our depositary units. If this method is not allowed under the Treasury Regulations, or only applies to transfers of less than all of the unitholder’s interest, our taxable income or losses might be reallocated among the holders of our depositary units. We are authorized to revise our method of allocation between transferor and transferee holders of our depositary units, as well as holders of our depositary units whose interests vary during a taxable year, as we deem necessary, but only to the extent permitted under the Code and the Treasury Regulations.

Notification Requirements

A unitholder who sells or exchanges depositary units is required to notify us in writing of that sale or exchange within 30 days after the sale or exchange and in any event by no later than January 15 of the year following the calendar year in which the sale or exchange occurred. We are required to notify the IRS of that transaction and to furnish certain information to the transferor and transferee. However, these reporting requirements do not apply with respect to a sale by an individual who is a citizen of the United States and who effects the sale or exchange through a broker. Additionally, a transferor and a transferee of a depositary unit will be required to furnish statements to the IRS, filed with their income tax returns for the taxable year in which the sale or exchange occurred, that set forth the amount of the consideration paid or received for the depositary unit. Failure to satisfy these reporting obligations may lead to the imposition of substantial penalties. Because we have made an election under Section 754 of the Internal Revenue Code, a purchaser of an interest in us, or its broker, is required to notify us of the transfer of such interest and we are required to include a statement with our partnership return for the taxable year in which we receive notice of the transfer, setting forth the name and taxpayer identification number of the transferee, the computation of any Section 743(b) basis adjustment and the allocation of such adjustment among the properties.

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Constructive Termination

We will be considered terminated if there is a sale or exchange of 50% or more of the total interests in our capital and profits within a 12-month period. Any such termination would, among other things, result in the closing of our taxable year for all holders of our depositary units. In the case of a unitholder reporting on a taxable year that does not end with our taxable year, the closing of our taxable year may result in more than 12 months of our taxable income or loss being includable in that unitholder’s taxable income for the year of termination. A constructive termination occurring on a date other than December 31 will result in us filing two tax returns for one fiscal year and the cost of preparing these returns will be borne by all holders of our depositary units. However, pursuant to an IRS relief procedure, the IRS may allow, among other things, a constructively terminated partnership to provide a single Schedule K-1 to each unitholder for the calendar year in which a termination occurs. New tax elections required to be made by us, including a new election under Section 754 of the Internal Revenue Code, must be made subsequent to a termination and a termination could result in a deferral of our deductions for depreciation. A termination could also result in penalties if we were unable to determine that the termination had occurred. Moreover, a termination might either accelerate the application of, or subject us to, any tax legislation enacted prior to the termination.

Uniformity of Depositary Units

Because we cannot match transferors and transferees of our depositary units, we must maintain uniformity of the economic and tax characteristics of our depositary units to a purchaser of these units. In the absence of uniformity, we may be unable to completely comply with a number of U.S. federal income tax requirements, both statutory and regulatory. For example, a lack of uniformity could result from a literal application of Treasury Regulation Section 1.167(c)-1(a)(6). Any non-uniformity could have a negative impact on the value of our depositary units.

Tax-Exempt Organizations and Certain Other Investors

Ownership of depositary units by employee benefit plans, other tax-exempt organizations, non-resident aliens, foreign corporations and other foreign persons raises issues unique to such persons and, as described below, may have substantially adverse tax consequences. Employee benefit plans and most other organizations exempt from U.S. federal income tax, including individual retirement accounts and other retirement plans, are subject to U.S. federal income tax on unrelated business taxable income (“UBTI”). Most types of passive investment income (such as dividends, interest, royalties, certain rents, and gains from the sale or other disposition of a capital asset) are excluded from UBTI. If, however, we invest in an entity that is tax-transparent for U.S. federal income tax purposes and such tax-transparent entity is engaged in a trade or business, our allocable share of any business income of that tax transparent entity will constitute UBTI. Tax-exempt organizations that own depositary units will be subject to tax on their allocable shares of our income that would be UBTI if realized directly by such tax-exempt organizations. Moreover, a tax-exempt owner of depositary units could be treated as earning UBTI to the extent that we derive income from “debt-financed property,” or if the ownership of depositary units itself is debt financed. Debt-financed property means property held to produce income with respect to which there is “acquisition indebtedness” (that is, indebtedness incurred in acquiring or holding property). It is likely that some portion of the taxable income derived by any tax-exempt organizations that own depositary units will be UBTI, and thus will be taxable to such unitholders.

Non-resident aliens and foreign corporations, foreign trusts or estates which hold depositary units will be considered to be engaged in business in the United States on account of ownership of depositary units. As a consequence they will be required to file U.S. federal income tax returns in respect of their share of our income, gain, loss or deduction and pay U.S. federal income tax at regular rates on any net income or gain. Generally, a partnership is required to pay a withholding tax on the portion of the partnership’s income which is effectively connected with the conduct of a United States trade or business and which is allocable to its foreign partners, regardless of whether any actual distributions have been made to such partners. However, under rules applicable to publicly traded partnerships, distributions to non-U.S. holders of our depositary units are subject to withholding at the highest marginal effective tax rate. Each foreign unitholder must obtain a taxpayer identification number from the IRS and submit that number to the applicable withholding agent on the appropriate Form W-8 in order to obtain credit for the taxes withheld. A change in applicable law may require us to change these procedures.

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Because a foreign corporation that owns depositary units will be treated as engaged in a United States trade or business, such a corporation will also be subject to United States branch profits tax at a rate of 30% (or any applicable lower treaty rate) of the portion of any reduction in the foreign corporation’s “U.S. net equity,” which is the result of our activities. In addition, such a unitholder is subject to special information reporting requirements under Section 6038C of the Internal Revenue Code.

In a published ruling, the IRS has taken the position that gain realized by a foreign unitholder who sells or otherwise disposes of a limited partnership unit will be treated as effectively connected with a United States trade or business of the foreign unitholder, and thus subject to U.S. federal income tax, to the extent that such gain is attributable to appreciated personal property used by the limited partnership in a United States trade or business. Moreover, a foreign unitholder is subject to U.S. federal income tax on gain realized on the sale or disposition of a depositary unit to the extent that such gain is attributable to appreciated United States real property interests; however, a foreign unitholder will not be subject to U.S. federal income tax under this rule unless such foreign unitholder has owned more than 5% in value of our depositary units at any time during the five-year period ending on the date of the sale or disposition, provided the depositary units are regularly traded on an established securities market at the time of the sale or disposition. Our depositary units are currently treated as regularly traded on an established securities market for this purpose.

Administrative Matters

Information Returns and Audit Procedures

We intend to furnish to each unitholder, within 90 days after the close of each calendar year, certain tax information, including a Schedule K-1 that sets forth such unitholder’s share of our income, gain, loss and deduction for our preceding taxable year. In preparing this information, which will generally not be reviewed by counsel, we will use various accounting and reporting conventions. We cannot assure prospective holders of our depositary units that the IRS will not successfully contend in court that such accounting and reporting conventions are impermissible. Any such challenge by the IRS could negatively affect the value of the depositary units.

The IRS may audit our U.S. federal income tax information returns. Adjustments resulting from any such audit may require each unitholder to adjust a prior year’s tax liability, and possibly may result in an audit of the unitholder’s own return. Any audit of a unitholder’s return could result in adjustments not related to our returns as well as those related to our returns.

Partnerships generally are treated as separate entities for purposes of U.S. federal tax audits, judicial review of administrative adjustments by the IRS and tax settlement proceedings. The tax treatment of partnership items of income, gain, loss and deduction is determined in a partnership proceeding rather than in separate proceedings with the partners. The Internal Revenue Code provides for one partner to be designated as the “tax matters partner” for these purposes. Our Partnership Agreement appoints our general partner as our tax matters partner.

The tax matters partner will make certain elections on our behalf and on behalf of the holders of our depositary units and can extend the statute of limitations for assessment of tax deficiencies against holders of our depositary units with respect to items in our returns. The tax matters partner may bind a unitholder with less than a 1% profits interest in us to a settlement with the IRS unless that unitholder elects, by filing a statement with the IRS, not to give such authority to the tax matters partner. The tax matters partner may seek judicial review, by which all of the holders of our depositary units are bound, of a final partnership administrative adjustment and, if the tax matters partner fails to seek judicial review, such review may be sought by any unitholder having at least a 1% interest in our profits and by holders of our depositary units having in the aggregate at least a 5% interest in our profits. However, only one action for judicial review will go forward, and each unitholder with an interest in the outcome may participate.

A unitholder must file a statement with the IRS identifying the treatment of any item on such unitholder’s U.S. federal income tax return that is not consistent with the treatment of the item on our return. Intentional or negligent disregard of the consistency requirement may subject a unitholder to substantial penalties.

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Nominee Reporting

Persons who hold an interest in us as a nominee for another person are required to furnish to us the following information: (a) the name, address and taxpayer identification number of the beneficial owner and the nominee; (b) whether the beneficial owner is (i) a person that is not a United States person, (ii) a foreign government, an international organization or any wholly-owned agency or instrumentality of either of the foregoing, or (iii) a tax-exempt entity; (c) the amount and description of depositary units held, acquired or transferred for the beneficial owner; and (d) certain information including the dates of acquisitions and transfers, means of acquisitions and transfers, and acquisition cost for purchases, as well as the amount of net proceeds from sales. Brokers and financial institutions are required to furnish additional information, including whether they are United States persons and certain information on depositary units that they acquire, hold or transfer for their own account. A penalty of $100 per failure, up to a maximum of $1,500,000 per calendar year, is imposed by the Internal Revenue Code for failure to report such information to us. The nominee is required to supply the beneficial owner of the depositary units with the information furnished to us.

Accuracy-Related Penalties

An additional tax equal to 20% of the amount of any portion of an underpayment of tax that is attributable to one or more specified causes, including negligence or disregard of rules or regulations, substantial understatements of income tax and substantial valuation misstatements, is imposed by the Internal Revenue Code. No penalty will be imposed, however, with respect to any portion of an underpayment if it is shown that there was a reasonable cause for that portion and that the taxpayer acted in good faith with respect to that portion.

A substantial understatement of income tax in any taxable year exists if the amount of the understatement exceeds the greater of 10% of the tax required to be shown on the return for the taxable year or $5,000 ($10,000 for most corporations). The amount of any understatement subject to penalty generally is reduced if any portion is attributable to a position adopted on the return (i) with respect to which there is, or was, “substantial authority” or (ii) as to which there is a reasonable basis and the pertinent facts of such position are disclosed on the return.

More stringent rules, which increase penalties and extend the statutes of limitations, apply to “tax shelters,” a term that in this context does not appear to include us, “listed transactions,” and “reportable transactions with a significant tax avoidance purpose.” We do not anticipate participating in “listed transactions” or “reportable transactions with a significant tax avoidance purpose.” However, if any item of our income, gain, loss or deduction included as a share of our income by a unitholder might result in such an “understatement” of income for which no “substantial authority” exists, we must disclose the pertinent facts on our return. In addition, we will make a reasonable effort to furnish sufficient information for holders of our depositary units to make adequate disclosure on their returns to avoid liability for this penalty.

A substantial valuation misstatement exists if the value of any property, or the adjusted basis of any property, claimed on a tax return is 150% or more of the amount determined to be the correct amount of such valuation or adjusted basis. No penalty is imposed unless the portion of the underpayment attributable to a substantial valuation misstatement exceeds $5,000 ($10,000 for most corporations). If the valuation claimed on a return is 200% or more than the correct valuation, the penalty imposed increases to 40%. Investors should consult their own tax advisors concerning any possible accuracy-related penalties with respect to their investment and should be aware that we and our material advisors intend to comply with the disclosure requirements.

In addition, the 20% accuracy-related penalty also applies to any portion of underpayment of tax that is attributable to transactions lacking economic substance. To the extent that such transactions are not disclosed, the penalty imposed is increased to 40%. Additionally, there is no reasonable cause defense to the imposition of this penalty to such transactions. Although we do not intend to engage in such transactions, it is possible that the IRS could assert that certain of transactions we engage in, either directly or through flow through entities treated as transparent for U.S. federal income tax purposes, lack economic substance.

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Reportable Transactions

If we were to engage in a “reportable transaction,” we (and possibly our holders of our depositary units) would be required to make a detailed disclosure of the transaction to the IRS. A transaction may be a reportable transaction based upon any of several factors, including the fact that it is a type of tax avoidance transaction publicly identified by the IRS as a “listed transaction” or that it produces certain kinds of losses for partnerships, individuals, S corporations, and trusts of at least $2 million in any single year, or $4 million in any combination of 6 successive tax years. Our participation in a reportable transaction could increase the likelihood that our U.S. federal income tax information return (and possibly the tax returns of our holders of our depositary units) would be audited by the IRS. Please read “— Information Returns and Audit Procedures.”

Moreover, if we were to participate in a reportable transaction with a significant purpose to avoid or evade tax, or in any listed transaction, a unitholder may be subject to the following additional consequences:

accuracy-related penalties with a broader scope, significantly narrower exceptions, and potentially greater amounts than described above at “— Accuracy-Related Penalties”;
for those persons otherwise entitled to deduct interest on federal tax deficiencies, nondeductibility of interest on any resulting tax liability; and
in the case of a listed transaction, an extended statute of limitations.

We do not expect to engage in any “reportable transactions.”

Withholding on Payments to Certain Foreign Entities

Sections 1471 through 1474 of the Code (referred to as “FATCA”) generally will impose a withholding tax of 30% on certain gross amounts of income not effectively connected with a U.S. trade or business paid to certain “foreign financial institutions” and certain other “non-financial foreign entities,” unless various information reporting requirements are satisfied. Amounts subject to withholding under these rules generally include gross U.S.-source dividend and interest income paid on or after January 1, 2014, gross proceeds from the sale of property that produces U.S.-source dividend or interest income paid on or after January 1, 2017, and certain other payments made by “participating” foreign financial institutions to “recalcitrant account holders” on or after January 1, 2017 (so-called “foreign pass thru payments”). Certain foreign unitholders will be required to enter into an agreement with the IRS and disclose certain information regarding their beneficial owners to the IRS. If such foreign unitholders fail to provide such information or to enter into such an agreement with the IRS as required under FATCA, it is possible that we could be required to impose a withholding tax of 30% on certain payments made to such foreign unitholders.

Although the application of these new rules to a sale or other disposal of a depositary unit is unclear, and strong arguments exist to the contrary, it is possible that the gross proceeds of the sale or other disposal of a depositary unit will be subject to tax under FATCA if such proceeds are treated as an indirect disposal of the foreign unitholder’s interest in assets that can produce U.S. source interest or dividends, unless the selling foreign unitholder provides appropriate reporting information. Investors are encouraged to consult their own tax advisors regarding the potential impact of FATCA on a foreign unitholder’s investment in our depositary units.

Legislative Developments

The present U.S. federal income tax treatment of publicly traded partnerships, including us, or an investment in our depositary units may be modified by legislative, judicial or administrative changes and differing interpretations thereof at any time. For example, the Obama Administration and members of Congress have considered substantive changes to the existing U.S. federal income tax laws that would affect the tax treatment of, or impose additional administrative requirements on, publicly traded partnerships. It is possible that these legislative efforts could result in changes to the existing U.S. federal income tax laws that affect publicly traded partnerships. We are unable to predict whether any of these changes, or other proposals, will ultimately be enacted. Any such changes could negatively impact the value of an investment in our units.

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State, Local and Other Tax Considerations

In addition to U.S. federal income taxes, a unitholder will be subject to other taxes, such as state and local income taxes, unincorporated business taxes, and estate, inheritance or intangible taxes that may be imposed by the various jurisdictions in which such unitholder resides or in which we do business or own property. Although an analysis of those various taxes is not presented here, each prospective unitholder should consider their potential impact on such unitholder’s investment in us. We currently conduct business in multiple states. A unitholder will be required to file state income tax returns and to pay state income taxes in some or all of the states in which we do business or own property and may be subject to penalties for failure to comply with those requirements. In certain states, tax losses may not produce a tax benefit in the year incurred and also may not be available to offset income in subsequent taxable years. Some of the states may require that we, or we may elect to, withhold a percentage of income from amounts to be distributed to a unitholder who is not a resident of the state. Our withholding of an amount, which may be greater or less than a particular unitholder’s income tax liability to the state, generally does not relieve the non-resident unitholder from the obligation to file an income tax return. Any amount that is withheld will be treated as distributed to holders of our depositary units. See “— Tax Treatment of Holders of Our Depositary Units — Entity-Level Collections” above. Based on current law and our estimate of future operations, we anticipate that any amounts required to be withheld will not be material.

It is the responsibility of each unitholder to investigate the legal and tax consequences of such unitholder’s investment in us under the laws of pertinent states and localities. Accordingly, each prospective unitholder should consult, and must depend upon, its own tax counsel or other advisor with regard to those matters. Further, it is the responsibility of each unitholder to file all state and local, as well as U.S. federal, tax returns that may be required of such unitholder. Proskauer Rose LLP has not rendered an opinion on the state or local tax consequences of an investment in us.

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UNDERWRITING

Subject to the terms and conditions set forth in the underwriting agreement, dated            , 2013, between us and Jefferies & Company, Inc., as underwriter, we have agreed to sell to the underwriter, and the underwriter has agreed to purchase from us, all depositary units offered by this prospectus supplement.

The underwriting agreement provides that the obligations of the underwriter are subject to certain conditions precedent such as the receipt by the underwriter of officers’ certificates and legal opinions and approval of certain legal matters by its counsel. The underwriting agreement provides that the underwriter will purchase all of the depositary units if any of them are purchased. We have agreed to indemnify the underwriter and certain of its controlling persons against certain liabilities, including liabilities under the Securities Act, and to contribute to payments that the underwriter may be required to make in respect of those liabilities.

The underwriter has advised us that, following the completion of this offering, it currently intends to make a market in the depositary units as permitted by applicable laws and regulations. However, the underwriter is not obligated to do so, and the underwriter may discontinue any market-making activities at any time without notice in its sole discretion. Accordingly, no assurance can be given as to the liquidity of the trading market for the depositary units, that you will be able to sell any of the depositary units held by you at a particular time or that the prices that you receive when you sell will be favorable.

The underwriter is offering the depositary units subject to its acceptance of the depositary units from us and subject to prior sale. The underwriter reserves the right to withdraw, cancel or modify offers to the public and to reject orders in whole or in part.

Commission and Expenses

The following table shows the public offering price, the underwriting discounts and commissions that we are to pay the underwriter and the proceeds, before expenses, to us in connection with this offering. Such amounts are shown assuming both no exercise and full exercise of the underwriter’s option to purchase additional depositary units.

       
  Per Depositary Unit   Total
     Without Option to Purchase Additional Depositary Units   With Option to Purchase Additional Depositary Units   Without Option to Purchase Additional Depositary Units   With
Option to Purchase Additional Depositary Units
Public offering price   $             $             $             $          
Underwriting discounts and commissions paid by us   $     $     $     $  
Proceeds to us, before expenses   $     $     $     $  

We estimate expenses payable by us in connection with this offering, other than the underwriting discounts and commissions referred to above, will be approximately $         .

Listing

Our depositary units have been approved for listing on The NASDAQ Global Select Market under the trading symbol “IEP.”

Stamp Taxes

If you purchase depositary units offered in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus, you may be required to pay stamp taxes and other charges under the laws and practices of the country of purchase, in addition to the offering price listed on the cover page of this prospectus supplement.

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Option to Purchase Additional Depositary Units

We have granted to the underwriter an option, exercisable for 30 days from the date of this prospectus supplement, to purchase, from time to time, in whole or in part, up to an aggregate of     depositary units from us at the public offering price set forth on the cover page of this prospectus supplement, less underwriting discounts and commissions.

No Sales of Similar Securities

We, our executive officers, directors, our general partner and Mr. Icahn and his affiliates have agreed, subject to specified exceptions, not to directly or indirectly:

sell, offer, contract or grant any option to sell (including any short sale), pledge, transfer, establish an open “put equivalent position” within the meaning of Rule 16a-l(h) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or
otherwise dispose of any depositary units, options or warrants to acquire depositary units, or securities exchangeable or exercisable for or convertible into depositary units currently or hereafter owned either of record or beneficially, or
publicly announce an intention to do any of the foregoing for a period of 65 days after the date of this prospectus supplement without the prior written consent of Jefferies & Company, Inc.

This restriction terminates after the close of trading of the depositary units on and including the 65th day after the date of this prospectus supplement. However, subject to certain exceptions, in the event that either:

during the last 17 days of the 65-day restricted period, we issue an earnings release or material news or a material event relating to us occurs, or
prior to the expiration of the 65-day restricted period, we announce that we will release earnings results during the 16-day period beginning on the last day of the 65-day restricted period,

then in either case the expiration of the 65-day restricted period will be extended until the expiration of the 18-day period beginning on the date of the issuance of an earnings release or the occurrence of the material news or event, as applicable, unless Jefferies & Company, Inc. waives, in writing, such an extension.

Jefferies & Company, Inc. may, in its sole discretion and at any time or from time to time before the termination of the 65-day period release all or any portion of the securities subject to lock-up agreements. There are no existing agreements between the underwriter and any of our unit holders who will execute a lock-up agreement, providing consent to the sale of units prior to the expiration of the lock-up period.

Stabilization

The underwriter has advised us that it, pursuant to Regulation M under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, may engage in short sale transactions, stabilizing transactions, syndicate covering transactions or the imposition of penalty bids in connection with this offering. These activities may have the effect of stabilizing or maintaining the market price of the depositary units at a level above that which might otherwise prevail in the open market. Establishing short sales positions may involve either “covered” short sales or “naked” short sales.

“Covered” short sales are sales made in an amount not greater than the underwriter’s option to purchase additional depositary units in this offering. The underwriter may close out any covered short position by either exercising its option to purchase additional depositary units or purchasing depositary units in the open market. In determining the source of depositary units to close out the covered short position, the underwriter will consider, among other things, the price of depositary units available for purchase in the open market as compared to the price at which it may purchase depositary units through the option to purchase additional depositary units.

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“Naked” short sales are sales in excess of the option to purchase additional depositary units. The underwriter must close out any naked short position by purchasing depositary units in the open market. A naked short position is more likely to be created if the underwriter is concerned that there may be downward pressure on the price of the depositary units in the open market after pricing that could adversely affect investors who purchase in this offering.

A stabilizing bid is a bid for the purchase of depositary units on behalf of the underwriter for the purpose of fixing or maintaining the price of the depositary units. A syndicate covering transaction is the bid for or the purchase of depositary units on behalf of the underwriter to reduce a short position incurred by the underwriter in connection with the offering. Similar to other purchase transactions, the underwriter’s purchases to cover the syndicate short sales may have the effect of raising or maintaining the market price of our depositary units or preventing or retarding a decline in the market price of our depositary units. As a result, the price of our depositary units may be higher than the price that might otherwise exist in the open market. A penalty bid is an arrangement permitting the underwriter to reclaim the selling concession otherwise accruing to a syndicate member in connection with the offering if the depositary units originally sold by such syndicate member are purchased in a syndicate covering transaction and therefore have not been effectively placed by such syndicate member.

Neither we nor the underwriter make any representation or prediction as to the direction or magnitude of any effect that the transactions described above may have on the price of the depositary units. The underwriter is not obligated to engage in these activities and, if commenced, any of the activities may be discontinued at any time.

The underwriter may also engage in passive market making transactions in our depositary units on The NASDAQ Global Select Market in accordance with Rule 103 of Regulation M during a period before the commencement of offers or sales of our depositary units in this offering and extending through the completion of distribution. A passive market maker must display its bid at a price not in excess of the highest independent bid of that security. However, if all independent bids are lowered below the passive market maker’s bid, that bid must then be lowered when specified purchase limits are exceeded.

Electronic Distribution

A prospectus in electronic format may be made available by e-mail or through online services maintained by the underwriter or any of its affiliates. In this case, prospective investors may view offering terms online and may be allowed to place orders online. The underwriter may agree with us to allocate a specific number of depositary units for sale to online brokerage account holders. Any such allocation for online distributions will be made by the underwriter on the same basis as other allocations. Other than the prospectus in electronic format, the information on the underwriter’s web site and any information contained in any other web site maintained by the underwriter or any of its affiliates is not part of this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus, has not been approved and/or endorsed by us or the underwriter and should not be relied upon by investors.

Other Activities and Relationships

The underwriter and certain of its affiliates are full service financial institutions engaged in various activities, which may include securities trading, commercial and investment banking, financial advisory, investment management, investment research, principal investment, hedging, financing and brokerage activities. The underwriter and certain of its affiliates have, from time to time, performed, and may in the future perform, various commercial and investment banking and financial advisory services for us and our affiliates, for which they received or will receive customary fees and expenses.

In the ordinary course of their various business activities, the underwriter and certain of its affiliates may make or hold a broad array of investments and actively trade debt and equity securities (or related derivative securities) and financial instruments (including bank loans) for their own account and for the accounts of their customers, and such investment and securities activities may involve securities and/or instruments issued by us and our affiliates. If the underwriter or its affiliates have a lending relationship with us, they routinely hedge their credit exposure to us consistent with their customary risk management policies. The underwriter and its

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affiliates may hedge such exposure by entering into transactions which consist of either the purchase of credit default swaps or the creation of short positions in our securities or the securities of our affiliates, including potentially the depositary units offered hereby. Any such short positions could adversely affect future trading prices of the depositary units offered hereby. The underwriter and certain of its affiliates may also communicate independent investment recommendations, market color or trading ideas and/or publish or express independent research views in respect of such securities or instruments and may at any time hold, or recommend to clients that they acquire, long and/or short positions in such securities and instruments.

Selling Restrictions

European Economic Area

In relation to each Member State of the European Economic Area that has implemented the Prospectus Directive (each, referred to as a “Relevant Member State”) an offer to the public of depositary units may not be made in that Relevant Member State, except that an offer to the public in that Relevant Member State of our depositary units may be made at any time under the following exemptions under the Prospectus Directive, if they have been implemented in that Relevant Member State:

(a) to any legal entity that is a qualified investor as defined in the Prospectus Directive;
(b) to fewer than 100 or, if the Relevant Member State has implemented the relevant provision of the 2010 PD Amending Directive, 150, natural or legal persons (other than qualified investors as defined in the Prospectus Directive), as permitted under the Prospectus Directive, subject to obtaining the prior consent of the underwriter for any such offer; or
(c) in any other circumstances falling within Article 3(2) of the Prospectus Directive, provided that no such offer of our depositary units shall result in a requirement for the publication by us or the underwriter of a prospectus pursuant to Article 3 of the Prospectus Directive.

For the purposes of this provision, the expression an “offer to the public” in relation to any depositary units in any Relevant Member State means the communication in any form and by any means of sufficient information on the terms of the offer and any depositary units to be offered so as to enable an investor to decide to purchase any depositary units, as the same may be varied in that Member State by any measure implementing the Prospectus Directive in that Member State, the expression “Prospectus Directive” means Directive 2003/71/EC (and amendments thereto, including the 2010 PD Amending Directive, to the extent implemented in the Relevant Member State), and includes any relevant implementing measure in the Relevant Member State, and the expression “2010 PD Amending Directive” means Directive 2010/73/EU.

United Kingdom

The underwriter has represented and agreed that:

(a) it has only communicated or caused to be communicated and will only communicate or cause to be communicated an invitation or inducement to engage in investment activity (within the meaning of Section 21 of the FSMA) received by it in connection with the issue or sale of our depositary units in circumstances in which Section 21(1) of the FSMA does not apply to us; and
(b) it has complied and will comply with all applicable provisions of the FSMA with respect to anything done by it in relation to our depositary units in, from or otherwise involving the United Kingdom.

Notice to Prospective Investors in Switzerland

The depositary units may not be publicly offered in Switzerland and will not be listed on the SIX Swiss Exchange, or SIX, or on any other stock exchange or regulated trading facility in Switzerland. This document has been prepared without regard to the disclosure standards for issuance prospectuses under art. 652a or art. 1156 of the Swiss Code of Obligations or the disclosure standards for listing prospectuses under art. 27 ff. of the SIX Listing Rules or the listing rules of any other stock exchange or regulated trading facility in Switzerland. Neither this document nor any other offering or marketing material relating to depositary units or the offering may be publicly distributed or otherwise made publicly available in Switzerland.

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Neither this document nor any other offering or marketing material relating to the offering, the issuer or the depositary units has been or will be filed with or approved by any Swiss regulatory authority. In particular, this document will not be filed with, and the offer of the depositary units will not be supervised by, the Swiss Financial Market Supervisory Authority, and the offer of depositary units has not been and will not be authorized under the Swiss Federal Act on Collective Investment Schemes, or CISA. The investor protection afforded to acquirers of interests in collective investment schemes under the CISA does not extend to acquirers of depositary units.

Notice to Prospective Investors in the Dubai International Financial Centre

This prospectus supplement relates to an exempt offer in accordance with the Offered Securities Rules of the Dubai Financial Services Authority, or DFSA. This prospectus supplement is intended for distribution only to persons of a type specified in the Offered Securities Rules of the DFSA. It must not be delivered to, or relied on by, any other person. The DFSA has no responsibility for reviewing or verifying any documents in connection with exempt offers. The DFSA has not approved this prospectus supplement nor taken steps to verify the information set forth herein and has no responsibility for the prospectus supplement. The securities to which this prospectus supplement relates may be illiquid and/or subject to restrictions on their resale. Prospective purchasers of the securities offered should conduct their own due diligence on the securities. If you do not understand the contents of this prospectus supplement you should consult an authorized financial advisor.

Notice to Prospective Investors in Hong Kong

The depositary units may not be offered or sold in Hong Kong by means of any document other than (i) in circumstances which do not constitute an offer to the public within the meaning of the Companies Ordinance (Cap. 32, Laws of Hong Kong), or (ii) to “professional investors” within the meaning of the Securities and Futures Ordinance (Cap. 571, Laws of Hong Kong) and any rules made thereunder, or (iii) in other circumstances which do not result in the document being a “prospectus” within the meaning of the Companies Ordinance (Cap. 32, Laws of Hong Kong) and no advertisement, invitation or document relating to the depositary units may be issued or may be in the possession of any person for the purpose of issue (in each case whether in Hong Kong or elsewhere), which is directed at, or the contents of which are likely to be accessed or read by, the public in Hong Kong (except if permitted to do so under the laws of Hong Kong) other than with respect to depositary units which are or are intended to be disposed of only to persons outside Hong Kong or only to “professional investors” within the meaning of the Securities and Futures Ordinance (Cap. 571, Laws of Hong Kong) and any rules made thereunder.

Notice to Prospective Investors in Japan

The depositary units offered in this supplement prospectus have not been and will not be registered under the Securities and Exchange Law of Japan. The underwriter has agreed that it will not offer or sell any depositary units, directly or indirectly, in Japan or to or for the benefit of any resident of Japan (which term as used herein means any person resident in Japan, including any corporation or other entity organized under the laws of Japan), or to other for re-offering or resale, directly or indirectly, in Japan or to a resident of Japan, except (i) pursuant to an exemption from the registration requirements of, and otherwise in compliance with, the Securities and Exchange Law of Japan and (ii) in compliance with any other applicable requirements of Japanese law.

Notice to Prospective Investors in Singapore

This prospectus supplement has not been registered as a prospectus with the Monetary Authority of Singapore. Accordingly, this prospectus supplement and any other document or material in connection with the offer or sale, or invitation for subscription or purchase, of the depositary units may not be circulated or distributed, nor may the depositary units be offered or sold, or be made the subject of an invitation for subscription or purchase, whether directly or indirectly, to persons in Singapore other than (i) to an institutional investor under Section 274 of the Securities and Futures Act, Chapter 289 of Singapore (the “SFA”), (ii) to a relevant person pursuant to Section 275(1), or any person pursuant to Section 275(1A), and in accordance with the conditions specified in Section 275 of the SFA or (iii) otherwise pursuant to, and in accordance with the conditions of, any other applicable provision of the SFA, in each case subject to compliance with conditions set forth in the SFA.

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Where the depositary units are subscribed or purchased under Section 275 of the SFA by a relevant person which is:

a corporation (which is not an accredited investor (as defined in Section 4A of the SFA)) the sole business of which is to hold investments and the entire share capital of which is owned by one or more individuals, each of whom is an accredited investor; or
a trust (where the trustee is not an accredited investor) whose sole purpose is to hold investments and each beneficiary of the trust is an individual who is an accredited investor, shares, debentures and units of shares and debentures of that corporation or the beneficiaries’ rights and interest (howsoever described) in that trust shall not be transferred within six months after that corporation or that trust has acquired the depositary units pursuant to an offer made under Section 275 of the SFA except
to an institutional investor (for corporations, under Section 274 of the SFA) or to a relevant person defined in Section 275(2) of the SFA, or to any person pursuant to an offer that is made on terms that such shares, debentures and units of shares and debentures of that corporation or such rights and interest in that trust are acquired at a consideration of not less than S$200,000 (or its equivalent in a foreign currency) for each transaction, whether such amount is to be paid for in cash or by exchange of securities or other assets, and further for corporations, in accordance with the conditions specified in Section 275 of the SFA;
where no consideration is or will be given for the transfer; or
where the transfer is by operation of law.

Notice to Prospective Investors in Australia

This prospectus supplement is not a formal disclosure document and has not been, nor will be, lodged with the Australian Securities and Investments Commission. It does not purport to contain all information that an investor or their professional advisers would expect to find in a prospectus or other disclosure document (as defined in the Corporations Act 2001 (Australia)) for the purposes of Part 6D.2 of the Corporations Act 2001 (Australia) or in a product disclosure statement for the purposes of Part 7.9 of the Corporations Act 2001 (Australia), in either case, in relation to the securities.

The securities are not being offered in Australia to “retail clients” as defined in sections 761G and 761GA of the Corporations Act 2001 (Australia). This offering is being made in Australia solely to “wholesale clients” for the purposes of section 761G of the Corporations Act 2001 (Australia) and, as such, no prospectus, product disclosure statement or other disclosure document in relation to the securities has been, or will be, prepared.

This prospectus supplement does not constitute an offer in Australia other than to wholesale clients. By submitting an application for our securities, you represent and warrant to us that you are a wholesale client for the purposes of section 761G of the Corporations Act 2001 (Australia). If any recipient of this prospectus supplement is not a wholesale client, no offer of, or invitation to apply for, our securities shall be deemed to be made to such recipient and no applications for our securities will be accepted from such recipient. Any offer to a recipient in Australia, and any agreement arising from acceptance of such offer, is personal and may only be accepted by the recipient. In addition, by applying for our securities you undertake to us that, for a period of 12 months from the date of issue of the securities, you will not transfer any interest in the securities to any person in Australia other than to a wholesale client.

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LEGAL MATTERS

The validity of the depositary units offered in this prospectus supplement will be passed upon for us by Proskauer Rose LLP, New York, New York. Certain legal matters in connection with the depositary units offered hereby will be passed upon for the underwriter by Latham & Watkins LLP, New York, New York.

EXPERTS

The consolidated balance sheets of Icahn Enterprises L.P. as of December 31, 2011 and 2010, and the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in equity and comprehensive income and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2011 and the financial statement schedule, incorporated by reference in this prospectus and elsewhere in this registration statement have been audited by Grant Thornton LLP, independent registered public accountants, as indicated in their report with respect thereto. The report of Grant Thornton LLP and the report of the other auditors, Ernst & Young LLP, are incorporated by reference herein in reliance upon the authority of said firms as experts in accounting and auditing in giving said reports.

With respect to the unaudited interim financial information of Icahn Enterprises L.P. for the quarters ended September 30, 2012, June 30, 2012 and March 31, 2012 and their comparative 2011 periods, respectively, which are incorporated by reference in this prospectus and elsewhere in the registration statement, Grant Thornton LLP and the other auditors, Ernst & Young LLP and KPMG LLP (with respect to the quarters ended September 30, 2012 and June 30, 2012), have reported that they have applied limited procedures in accordance with professional standards for a review of such information. The respective reports of Grant Thornton LLP and the other auditors, Ernst & Young LLP and KPMG LLP, state that they did not audit and they do not express an opinion on that interim financial information. Accordingly, the degree of reliance on their respective reports on such information should be restricted in light of the limited nature of the review procedures applied. In addition, Grant Thornton LLP and the other auditors, Ernst & Young LLP and KPMG LLP, are not subject to the liability provisions of Section 11 of the Securities Act of 1933 for their respective reports on the unaudited interim financial information because those reports are not a “part” of the registration statement prepared or certified by the accountants within the meaning of Sections 7 and 11 of that Act.

WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION

We file annual, quarterly and current reports, proxy statements and other information with the SEC under the Exchange Act. You may read and copy all or any portion of this information at the SEC’s principal office in Washington, D.C., and copies of all or any part thereof may be obtained from the Public Reference Section of the SEC, 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549 after payment of fees prescribed by the SEC. Please call the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330 for further information about the public reference room.

The SEC also maintains an Internet website that contains reports, proxy statements and other information about issuers, like Icahn Enterprises, who file electronically with the SEC. The address of that site is www.sec.gov.

Our Internet website address is www.ieplp.com. This reference to our website is intended to be an inactive textual reference only. Our website and the information contained therein or connected thereto are not incorporated by reference into the prospectus.

Our depositary units are listed on The NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “IEP.”

We have filed with the SEC a registration statement on Form S-3 to register the depositary units to be sold in connection with this prospectus supplement. As permitted by the rules and regulations of the SEC, this prospectus supplement and the accompany prospectus, which forms a part of the registration statement, does not contain all of the information included in the registration statement. For further information pertaining to us and the securities offered under this prospectus supplement, reference is made to the registration statement and the attached exhibits and schedules. Although required material information has been presented in this prospectus supplement, statements contained in this prospectus supplement as to the contents or provisions of any contract or other document referred to in this prospectus supplement may be summary in nature and in

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each instance reference is made to the copy of this contract or other document filed as an exhibit to the registration statement and each statement is qualified in all respects by this reference, including the exhibits and schedules filed therewith. You should rely only on the information incorporated by reference or provided in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus. We have not authorized anyone else to provide you with different information. You should not assume that the information in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus is accurate as of any date other than the date on the cover page of this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus. Our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospectus may have changed since that date.

INCORPORATION OF INFORMATION FILED WITH THE SEC

The SEC allows us to “incorporate by reference” information into this prospectus supplement, which means that we can disclose important information to you by referring you to another document filed separately with the SEC. The information incorporated by reference is deemed to be part of this prospectus supplement from the date that we file that document, except for any information that is superseded by subsequent incorporated documents or by information that is contained directly in this prospectus supplement. This prospectus supplement incorporates by reference the documents set forth below that we have previously filed with the SEC and that are not delivered with this prospectus supplement. These documents contain important information about Icahn Enterprises and its financial condition.

Our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011, filed with the SEC on March 12, 2012 (SEC File No. 001-09516);
Our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q for the fiscal quarters ended March 31, 2012, June 30, 2012 and September 30, 2012 filed with the SEC on May 1, 2012, August 7, 2012 and November 7, 2012, respectively (SEC File No. 001-09516); and
Our Current Reports on Form 8-K or 8-K/A, filed with the SEC on January 17, 2012, February 6, 2012, March 13, 2012, March 22, 2012, April 23, 2012, May 7, 2012, July 9, 2012, July 12, 2012, July 27, 2012, August 23, 2012, August 28, 2012, September 7, 2012, October 1, 2012, October 29, 2012, December 3, 2012, December 20, 2012, January 29, 2013, February 6, 2013, February 11, 2013 and February 21, 2013 (SEC File No. 001-09516).

This prospectus is part of a registration statement we filed with the SEC. You should rely only on the information or representations provided in this prospectus. We have authorized no one to provide you with different information. We are not making an offer of these securities in any state where the offer is not permitted.

All documents filed by us pursuant to Sections 13(a), 13(c), 14 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act (excluding any information in those documents that is deemed by the rules of the SEC to be furnished and not filed) between the date of this prospectus supplement and the termination of the offering of securities under this prospectus supplement shall also be deemed to be incorporated herein by reference. Any statement contained in any document incorporated or deemed to be incorporated by reference herein shall be deemed to be modified or superseded for purposes of this prospectus supplement to the extent that a statement contained in this prospectus supplement or in any other subsequently filed document which also is or is deemed to be incorporated by reference in this prospectus modifies or supersedes such statement. Any statement so modified or superseded shall not be deemed, except as so modified or superseded, to constitute a part of this prospectus supplement.

You may request a copy of these filings (not including the exhibits to such documents unless the exhibits are specifically incorporated by reference in the information contained in this prospectus), at no cost, by writing or telephoning us at the following address:

Icahn Enterprises L.P.
767 Fifth Avenue, Suite 4700
New York, New York 10153
Attn: Chief Financial Officer
Telephone requests may be directed to (212) 702-4300

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PROSPECTUS     

$1,000,000,000

ICAHN ENTERPRISES L.P.

ICAHN ENTERPRISES FINANCE CORP.

Depositary Units Representing Limited Partnership Interests
Preferred Units Representing Limited Partnership Interests
Debt Securities (including Guarantees of Non-Convertible